Social working - keeping the likes on

Social media exploitation by the business seemed like such a simple idea when so few we’re using it, but the arms race has moved on. Organisations need social media strategies, plans and multiple-faceted teams that acknowledge that social media is a permanent aspect of business that impacts many areas whilst specific social media sites are just isolated ships that may pass in the night. Without an all-embracing strategy, all they might make is a few more friends, rather than adding more to the bottom line.

via Quocirca Insights

Deploying A Social Business Strategy 
A social business strategy enables deeper customer engagement, better content, marketing aligned to business goals and more. A robust supply of content, in the right channel at the right time for the right customer, is essential for reaching consumers with your value message.
via Michael Brito, Social Business News

Deploying A Social Business Strategy 

A social business strategy enables deeper customer engagement, better content, marketing aligned to business goals and more. A robust supply of content, in the right channel at the right time for the right customer, is essential for reaching consumers with your value message.

via Michael Brito, Social Business News

Social business allows organisations to open up the strategy making process … to bring employees into deciding where the company should go…to bring customers into the mix to share their thoughts on how you can serve them better.

Choose your social business strategy first.  A tool-first emphasis tends to wag the dog and is invariably a disservice to the work itself. It also will likely hold back organizations seeking to get the most from social business — the effort becomes constrained around what an individual tool is capable of, rather than trying to determine what the business actually needs. Via The BrainYard -InformationWeek 

Choose your social business strategy first.  A tool-first emphasis tends to wag the dog and is invariably a disservice to the work itself. It also will likely hold back organizations seeking to get the most from social business — the effort becomes constrained around what an individual tool is capable of, rather than trying to determine what the business actually needs. Via The BrainYard -InformationWeek 

Three “facts” about social business are accepted without question by most people. That any business with a Facebook page or Twitter account is considered “social”; that hiring a social media person constitutes a social “presence”; that implementing an intranet transforms the organization into a “collaborative” enterprise. Now that I‘ve used up my allocation of quotation marks, I’m going to explain why these facts are pure myths.

How To Move Away from the Industrial Age Company Model - Forbes
If Social Business is really transforming the way we do business why are most of the stories and cases out there focused on changes to a single business function like marketing, human resources, or customer service? Shouldn’t it act as a change across several of these functions, or for that matter will these functions go away or change so fundamentally that we can no longer tell them apart?
It may appear to be a fine distinction but yet a very important one. Transforming a business process may involve one or two functional silos like sales and customer service. Transforming how a company is organized on the other hand asks use to review basic question of how a firm should operate. It asks if we need separate business functions to do production, distribution, marketing, or sales.
I read author, thought leader and the ‘female James Bond for Innovation’ Nilofer Merchant’s great five part series on Harvard Business Review, Rules for the Social Era, that asks the fundamental questions of why organizations are designed the way they are. In particular, she refers to how organizations still operate according to Harvard University professor Michael Porter’s Value Chain model, a classic business strategy definition of  of how companies should be organized to determine their market competitiveness.

How To Move Away from the Industrial Age Company Model - Forbes

If Social Business is really transforming the way we do business why are most of the stories and cases out there focused on changes to a single business function like marketing, human resources, or customer service? Shouldn’t it act as a change across several of these functions, or for that matter will these functions go away or change so fundamentally that we can no longer tell them apart?

It may appear to be a fine distinction but yet a very important one. Transforming a business process may involve one or two functional silos like sales and customer service. Transforming how a company is organized on the other hand asks use to review basic question of how a firm should operate. It asks if we need separate business functions to do production, distribution, marketing, or sales.

I read author, thought leader and the ‘female James Bond for Innovation’ Nilofer Merchant’s great five part series on Harvard Business Review, Rules for the Social Erathat asks the fundamental questions of why organizations are designed the way they are. In particular, she refers to how organizations still operate according to Harvard University professor Michael Porter’s Value Chain model, a classic business strategy definition of  of how companies should be organized to determine their market competitiveness.

Why Recognizing Your Employees on Social Media Is Great for Business | Mashable
Social media has opened countless new avenues for promotion of all  kinds. As a result of blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more, it’s as if we  all have access to a bullhorn, and thus, the ability to promote  ourselves whenever and to whomever we choose.
Within your company, surely you’ve grappled with the use, disuse and  even misuse of social media. But have you thought about using it for  employee recognition? Communicate your staff appreciation by employing  social media as a positive acknowledgement tool. It’s a highly visible  and yet low-cost way to show your support.
Zoomerang interviewed 1,180 small to mid-sized business decision makers and 500 consumers for its study, “Marketing in a Digital World.”
They found that the three most important reasons small businesses leverage social media are:
To connect with customers.
To increase visibility.
To self-promote.
It’s time to add employee appreciation to the mix.

Why Recognizing Your Employees on Social Media Is Great for Business | Mashable

Social media has opened countless new avenues for promotion of all kinds. As a result of blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more, it’s as if we all have access to a bullhorn, and thus, the ability to promote ourselves whenever and to whomever we choose.

Within your company, surely you’ve grappled with the use, disuse and even misuse of social media. But have you thought about using it for employee recognition? Communicate your staff appreciation by employing social media as a positive acknowledgement tool. It’s a highly visible and yet low-cost way to show your support.

Zoomerang interviewed 1,180 small to mid-sized business decision makers and 500 consumers for its study, “Marketing in a Digital World.”

They found that the three most important reasons small businesses leverage social media are:

  • To connect with customers.
  • To increase visibility.
  • To self-promote.

It’s time to add employee appreciation to the mix.