Where is the social supply chain going? Models that predict where interactions should be occurring in the supply chain and then mapping out where they are actually occurring. This could expose personality and political hurdles as well as best practices of the people who are making this work in the very best way.
(via Case Study: Is the Procurement Department Finally Ready for Social Media? - Business 2 Community)

Where is the social supply chain going? Models that predict where interactions should be occurring in the supply chain and then mapping out where they are actually occurring. This could expose personality and political hurdles as well as best practices of the people who are making this work in the very best way.

(via Case Study: Is the Procurement Department Finally Ready for Social Media? - Business 2 Community)


Imagine this scenario: A dinner guest to The Cheesecake Factory in Louisville, Ky. informs his waiter about some funky tasting ketchup. Simultaneously, across the country in Palo Alto, Calif., a customer complains about the color and consistency of the ketchup on his burger. 
Are these two scenarios related and potentially linked back to a bad batch from a supplier? And if so, will The Cheesecake Factory be able to prevent such incidences from occurring?
“You need to take structured data like a restaurant’s location and combine it with unstructured data like the color of the mustard or taste of the ketchup,” said Paul Chang, a program director for the consumer products team at IBM.
For restaurant chains with dozens of locations and hundreds of suppliers, it’s a near impossible task to maintain the consistency of ingredients. One screw up from a supplier and they risk unhappy customers, or worse still, a rogue meatball infected with horse meat.



via IBM uses ‘big data’ tech to keep horse out of your meatballs | VentureBeat

Imagine this scenario: A dinner guest to The Cheesecake Factory in Louisville, Ky. informs his waiter about some funky tasting ketchup. Simultaneously, across the country in Palo Alto, Calif., a customer complains about the color and consistency of the ketchup on his burger. 

Are these two scenarios related and potentially linked back to a bad batch from a supplier? And if so, will The Cheesecake Factory be able to prevent such incidences from occurring?

“You need to take structured data like a restaurant’s location and combine it with unstructured data like the color of the mustard or taste of the ketchup,” said Paul Chang, a program director for the consumer products team at IBM.

For restaurant chains with dozens of locations and hundreds of suppliers, it’s a near impossible task to maintain the consistency of ingredients. One screw up from a supplier and they risk unhappy customers, or worse still, a rogue meatball infected with horse meat.

via IBM uses ‘big data’ tech to keep horse out of your meatballs | VentureBeat

The social supply chain world is more alive than you might think… Sure, we might not be tweeting our POs or collaborating via Chatter to share demand schedules and haggle over commodity price escalation amongst supply chain partners yet. But we’re further ahead than it might appear.

The Social Supply Chain Webinar with Lora Cecere and Lisa Shambro (by Altimeter Group)

Is the supply chain ready to be social? And, if so, how do companies begin the journey? What steps do they take? Watch this lively discussion as Lora Cecere, Altimeter Group engages in dialogue on the topic with Lisa Shambro, Executive Director of the Foundation for Strategic Sourcing (F4SS) which is focused on the development of best practice standards in the extended CPG supply chain between contract manufacturers, secondary packagers and brand owners.