Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code
Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.
The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.
In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.
“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”
Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code

Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.

The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.

In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.

“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”

Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

(via smarterplanet)

Why top-down transformation works

Many social enterprise advocates reverse this order of priority, emphasizing the importance of things like empowerment, egalitarianism and engagement in creating the kind of cultural environment that enables employees to leverage social tools most effectively. As an extension of that argument, they’ll emphasize that more hierarchical and command-and-control environments are not only not conducive to social technologies, but that they’re antithetical to them. As well intentioned as these ideas may be, they’re a little bit misguided and maybe even counterproductive. The truth of the matter is that social technologies can work perfectly well in more traditional cultures because of the ways in which they can enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Especially in the short term, performance values may be the biggest drivers of adoption, so their importance should be emphasized rather than minimized.
(via The Bricks and Mortar of Digital Transformation)

Why top-down transformation works

Many social enterprise advocates reverse this order of priority, emphasizing the importance of things like empowerment, egalitarianism and engagement in creating the kind of cultural environment that enables employees to leverage social tools most effectively. As an extension of that argument, they’ll emphasize that more hierarchical and command-and-control environments are not only not conducive to social technologies, but that they’re antithetical to them. As well intentioned as these ideas may be, they’re a little bit misguided and maybe even counterproductive. The truth of the matter is that social technologies can work perfectly well in more traditional cultures because of the ways in which they can enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Especially in the short term, performance values may be the biggest drivers of adoption, so their importance should be emphasized rather than minimized.

(via The Bricks and Mortar of Digital Transformation)


An overarching taxonomy for adoption of social technologies — …focuses on three key experiences — customer experience, employee experience and partner experience. Bridging these 3 experiences are technologies like enterprise social networks, digital commerce and socialytics.

(via Social Business Maturity Model, The Next Generation : Enterprise Irregulars)

An overarching taxonomy for adoption of social technologies —

…focuses on three key experiences — customer experience, employee experience and partner experience. Bridging these 3 experiences are technologies like enterprise social networks, digital commerce and socialytics.

(via Social Business Maturity Model, The Next Generation : Enterprise Irregulars)

From a pilot with 400 to 500,000 users
Royal Philips Electronics, a healthcare, lifestyle, and lighting business that prides itself on innovation, needed a better way to connect its 120,000 global employees and improve collaboration. Over the last four years, the company’s network, called Philips Community, has grown to more than 50,000 users. Read how they did it
(via Social Business: Slow And Steady Worked For Philips - InformationWeek)

From a pilot with 400 to 500,000 users

Royal Philips Electronics, a healthcare, lifestyle, and lighting business that prides itself on innovation, needed a better way to connect its 120,000 global employees and improve collaboration. Over the last four years, the company’s network, called Philips Community, has grown to more than 50,000 users. Read how they did it

(via Social Business: Slow And Steady Worked For Philips - InformationWeek)

According to IDC’s analysis of 2013 revenue, the global market for enterprise social software applications grew from USD 968 million in 2012 to USD 1.24 billion in 2013.

IBM ranked #1 in worldwide market share for enterprise social software, for the fifth consectuive year.

IBM is global leader in enterprise social software: IDC | Business Standard

Strategy is critical to measuring values of communities

 The good news is that 76 percent of communities have approved strategies. This is a great indication that organizations and executives can now envision the value communities will contribute to their business and suggests a maturing market.

(via Want to Succeed in Social Business? Invest in It.)

Strategy is critical to measuring values of communities


The good news is that 76 percent of communities have approved strategies. This is a great indication that organizations and executives can now envision the value communities will contribute to their business and suggests a maturing market.

(via Want to Succeed in Social Business? Invest in It.)

Why an RFP response deserves a dedicated social network

A private community in an enterprise social network enables the detailed textual response to the RFP to be presented alongside supporting rich media such as videos and presentations. It allows the vendor to present the team working with the prospect, and to establish broader lines of communication between the vendor and buyer.

(via Social Business For Real Work 6: Delivering and Discussing An RFP Response)

Why an RFP response deserves a dedicated social network

A private community in an enterprise social network enables the detailed textual response to the RFP to be presented alongside supporting rich media such as videos and presentations. It allows the vendor to present the team working with the prospect, and to establish broader lines of communication between the vendor and buyer.

(via Social Business For Real Work 6: Delivering and Discussing An RFP Response)