Content tips for using marketing automation software+ It’s better to deliver two exceptional pieces of content per month through your marketing automation, than to post content that doesn’t hold any real value twice a week.+ Make your first pieces of content to new prospects short, casual, and wholly educational (no selling allowed yet). Once the channel of communication gradually opens, you can begin to nurture with more hearty pieces of education, then get into the promotional content.+ Create content appropriate for each stage of the sales funnel
Via Content Tips to get Better Performance from Your Marketing Automation Software | Business 2 Community

Content tips for using marketing automation software
+ It’s better to deliver two exceptional pieces of content per month through your marketing automation, than to post content that doesn’t hold any real value twice a week.
+ Make your first pieces of content to new prospects short, casual, and wholly educational (no selling allowed yet). Once the channel of communication gradually opens, you can begin to nurture with more hearty pieces of education, then get into the promotional content.
+ Create content appropriate for each stage of the sales funnel


Via Content Tips to get Better Performance from Your Marketing Automation Software | Business 2 Community

"Social" changes every part of the business model

Social era business models, says Nilofer Merchant in her article, “Stop talking about social and do it,” need to keep up with “fundamental and irrevocable” changes like these:

Nilofer-Merchant-Social-Era-in-Business.jpg

Via Harvard Business Review

How IBMers Use Social Media to Get Things Done — 4 Examples - SocialTimes.com
Edward L. Linde II, Senior Marketing Manager 
My team and I are leading the effort to transform our North American  sales force into “Digital Sellers” who use LinkedIn, Twitter, eContact  and Sametime 8.5.2 [IBM’s internal instant messaging system] to engage  and collaborate with their clients. We are also leveraging Social Media  to mine for sales leads from small and mid-sized businesses.
As a manager of 16 employees spread across the United States and  Canada, I depend on Sametime 8.5.2 and IBM Connections [IBM’s enterprise  social software platform] to collaborate with and manage my team and to  be a helpful, indispensable resource to breakdown barriers, navigate  the matrix and to help them succeed.

How IBMers Use Social Media to Get Things Done — 4 Examples - SocialTimes.com

Edward L. Linde II, Senior Marketing Manager

My team and I are leading the effort to transform our North American sales force into “Digital Sellers” who use LinkedIn, Twitter, eContact and Sametime 8.5.2 [IBM’s internal instant messaging system] to engage and collaborate with their clients. We are also leveraging Social Media to mine for sales leads from small and mid-sized businesses.

As a manager of 16 employees spread across the United States and Canada, I depend on Sametime 8.5.2 and IBM Connections [IBM’s enterprise social software platform] to collaborate with and manage my team and to be a helpful, indispensable resource to breakdown barriers, navigate the matrix and to help them succeed.

Avaya trains sales reps virtually – Hypergrid Business
The flight simulator celebrated its 100s anniversary a couple of  years ago. A training rig was developed in 1909 to help pilots operate  the control wheels of the early monoplanes in a safe environment and its  predecessors have been a mainstay of pilot training ever since.  Translating this concept to a “social simulator” to help practice  interpersonal skills like “executive selling” has proven harder.
While we wouldn’t fly with a pilot that learned about flying from a  PowerPoint presentation and answered multiple choice questions, most  sales organizations are content with this industrial model of training.  Sales reps don’t routinely practice and fail in a safe simulation  environment the way pilots do.
Avaya’s sales organization is determined to change that.
Working in partnership with its global sales organization and  Visualize Inc., we created a “Virtual Rehearsal Studio” in its own  web.alive environment.
“The purpose with our session in web.alive was to run a collaborative  learning and rehearsal session without the travel costs and time of  class room training,” said Rhonda Duesterberg, Avaya’s senior manager  for global sales learning and development.
Sales representatives practice preparing for a customer visit and  role-playing customer conversations in the 3D immersive environment.
(IBM’s Virtual Center runs on the web.alive platform, and is open for social business collaborations, meetings, events and other applications.)

Avaya trains sales reps virtually – Hypergrid Business

The flight simulator celebrated its 100s anniversary a couple of years ago. A training rig was developed in 1909 to help pilots operate the control wheels of the early monoplanes in a safe environment and its predecessors have been a mainstay of pilot training ever since. Translating this concept to a “social simulator” to help practice interpersonal skills like “executive selling” has proven harder.

While we wouldn’t fly with a pilot that learned about flying from a PowerPoint presentation and answered multiple choice questions, most sales organizations are content with this industrial model of training. Sales reps don’t routinely practice and fail in a safe simulation environment the way pilots do.

Avaya’s sales organization is determined to change that.

Working in partnership with its global sales organization and Visualize Inc., we created a “Virtual Rehearsal Studio” in its own web.alive environment.

“The purpose with our session in web.alive was to run a collaborative learning and rehearsal session without the travel costs and time of class room training,” said Rhonda Duesterberg, Avaya’s senior manager for global sales learning and development.

Sales representatives practice preparing for a customer visit and role-playing customer conversations in the 3D immersive environment.

(IBM’s Virtual Center runs on the web.alive platform, and is open for social business collaborations, meetings, events and other applications.)

Car dealers turn toward social media - USATODAY.com

Just a few years ago, John Pohlig might have hung up balloons and perhaps an inflatable gorilla outside this Honda dealership here to attract shoppers.

Instead he’s posting notes on Facebook and other social media sites. The effort is aimed at getting people to comment on what kind of car they’re likely to drive on a vacation — and includes dangling the chance to win a free iPad in return for a “like” endorsement on Facebook.

Four thousand “likes” later, and Scott Robinson Honda has a huge Facebook base. But can Pohlig, the dealer’s marketing director, point to actual car sales from his activities?

Smarter Planet - Social business - Overview 
The world now spends more than 110 billion minutes on social networks and blog sites per month. This equates to 22 percent of all time online―or one in every 4.5 minutes. 
Just ten years ago, there was another significant shift in the way  people interacted with each other: the Web came to the workplace. From  e-commerce and peer-to-to peer file sharing to the emergence of  web-based solutions for financial, accounting, and supply chain systems,  the web has become a serious business tool for organizations and  industries of every kind. And the evolution continues.
Now social networking services are on track to replace email as the  primary communications method for many business users in the next few  years. It’s a concept IBM social computing evangelist Luis Suarez has advocated for several years. But this new paradigm impacts more  than the inbox. As each company looks to incorporate social networking  technologies, it is, in fact, becoming what IBM calls a Social Business.
This approach shifts the focus from static content and other  temporary artifacts to the source of the energy, creativity, and  decision making that moves the business forward: people. As a result,  people not only find what they need, but also discover valuable  expertise and information they weren’t even looking for that might solve  a problem in a new way.
It’s no longer a BtoB or BtoC relationship. It’s PtoP. People to people isn’t about file sharing. It means that every  department, from HR to marketing to product development to customer  service, uses social media the way it uses any other tool and channel to  do its job. A company that uses social networking tools fluently to  communicate with people inside and outside the company acts as a Social  Business.
So what does a Social Business look like?
A Social Business isn’t just a company that has a Facebook page and  a Twitter account. A Social Business is one that embraces and  cultivates a spirit of collaboration and community throughout its  organization—both internally and externally.
IBM has identified three distinct characteristics of a Social Business:
A Social Business is engaged—deeply connecting people, including customers, employees, and partners, to be involved in productive, efficient ways.
A Social Business is transparent—removing boundaries to information, experts and assets, helping people align every action to drive business results.
A Social Business is nimble—speeding up business with information and insight to anticipate and address evolving opportunities.
Download Social Business white papers
Social Business: advent of a new age (959KB)
Becoming a Social Business: the IBM story (180KB)
IBM Social Business Jam Report (2MB)

Smarter Planet - Social business - Overview

The world now spends more than 110 billion minutes on social networks and blog sites per month. This equates to 22 percent of all time online―or one in every 4.5 minutes. 

Just ten years ago, there was another significant shift in the way people interacted with each other: the Web came to the workplace. From e-commerce and peer-to-to peer file sharing to the emergence of web-based solutions for financial, accounting, and supply chain systems, the web has become a serious business tool for organizations and industries of every kind. And the evolution continues.

Now social networking services are on track to replace email as the primary communications method for many business users in the next few years. It’s a concept IBM social computing evangelist Luis Suarez has advocated for several years. But this new paradigm impacts more than the inbox. As each company looks to incorporate social networking technologies, it is, in fact, becoming what IBM calls a Social Business.

This approach shifts the focus from static content and other temporary artifacts to the source of the energy, creativity, and decision making that moves the business forward: people. As a result, people not only find what they need, but also discover valuable expertise and information they weren’t even looking for that might solve a problem in a new way.

It’s no longer a BtoB or BtoC relationship. It’s PtoP.
People to people isn’t about file sharing. It means that every department, from HR to marketing to product development to customer service, uses social media the way it uses any other tool and channel to do its job. A company that uses social networking tools fluently to communicate with people inside and outside the company acts as a Social Business.

So what does a Social Business look like?

A Social Business isn’t just a company that has a Facebook page and a Twitter account. A Social Business is one that embraces and cultivates a spirit of collaboration and community throughout its organization—both internally and externally.

IBM has identified three distinct characteristics of a Social Business:

Download Social Business white papers

The social vending revolution has begun.

Says Pepsi, “Social Vending extends our consumers’ social networks beyond the confines of their own devices and transforms a static, transaction-oriented experience into something fun and exciting they’ll want to return to, again and again.”

Of course, sending the gift of a Diet Pepsi could be a bit of a Trojan horse.

via dtdigital:

(via dtdigital-deactivated20121106)