A SAP whitepaper earlier this year claimed that the average business loses around $25,000 per employee because of communication barriers, whilst a McKinsey report claimed that a successful implementation of an enterprise social network could deliver productivity gains of 25%.

Organizations can achieve unprecedented business results by using social media to effectively tap into the power of mass collaboration. New mass collaboration capabilities are irreversibly redefining what it means to be a highly productive organization.

Mark P. McDonald, group vice president and head of research at Gartner Executive Programs.  From “Gartner Reveals the Next Chapter in Modern Business Management: The Social Organization” (via horizonwatching)

(via eeehutton)

 Solving Email Overload With A Company-Wide Ban | TechCrunch
The CEO of a large European-based tech firm hates email and wants his 74,000 employees in 42 countries to stop using it.  Thierry Breton, CEO of Atos, wants his “zero email” policy to be in place within a year-and-a-half.  He told the Daily Mail only 10% of emails turn out to be important and that “email is no  longer the appropriate tool.  It is time to think differently.”
TechCrunch writers have a long history of trying to solve email overload.  MG Siegler quit email for a month earlier this year and wrote about it when his experiment ended.  Michael Arrington has discussed his email overload problem and how it’s an opportunity for an entreprenuer.  We covered Gmail Priority Inbox which helps you focus on the important emails.  I wrote about the 3 sentence email concept.  We’ve also written about Shortmail, which tries to keep email, well, short.  And there have been many other posts too.

 Solving Email Overload With A Company-Wide Ban | TechCrunch

The CEO of a large European-based tech firm hates email and wants his 74,000 employees in 42 countries to stop using it. Thierry Breton, CEO of Atos, wants his “zero email” policy to be in place within a year-and-a-half. He told the Daily Mail only 10% of emails turn out to be important and that “email is no longer the appropriate tool. It is time to think differently.”

TechCrunch writers have a long history of trying to solve email overload. MG Siegler quit email for a month earlier this year and wrote about it when his experiment ended. Michael Arrington has discussed his email overload problem and how it’s an opportunity for an entreprenuer. We covered Gmail Priority Inbox which helps you focus on the important emails. I wrote about the 3 sentence email concept. We’ve also written about Shortmail, which tries to keep email, well, short. And there have been many other posts too.

11 iPad Apps For Better Collaboration - The BrainYard - InformationWeek
What makes a tablet a tool? The apps, of course. Apple’s iPad is clearly finding its way into the enterprise, whether on a corporate purchase order or as a personal device brought into the office. No matter its origin, the range of productive—and hopefully profitable—uses for Apple’s market-leading tablet seem to expand by the day, thanks largely to a similarly growing menu of business-ready applications. That’s perhaps most evident in the collaboration world: now more than ever, business users are able to connect and achieve their goals anywhere, anytime.

11 iPad Apps For Better Collaboration - The BrainYard - InformationWeek

What makes a tablet a tool? The apps, of course. Apple’s iPad is clearly finding its way into the enterprise, whether on a corporate purchase order or as a personal device brought into the office. No matter its origin, the range of productive—and hopefully profitable—uses for Apple’s market-leading tablet seem to expand by the day, thanks largely to a similarly growing menu of business-ready applications. That’s perhaps most evident in the collaboration world: now more than ever, business users are able to connect and achieve their goals anywhere, anytime.

Social Business @ IBM Global Business Services

A presentation with some samples of projects I’m working on to help our consulting organization, GBS, become a “social business” unit, part of IBM’s broader transformation and embrace of social innovations deeper into its global operations and institutional DNA.

Tony Schwartz, MIX Maverick and author of The Way We’re Working isn’t Working, shares four simple but powerful changes you can make today to ramp up your productivity, creativity, and well-being.

Paul Higgins: I have been involved in the MIX on a management hackathon project and have both enjoyed the experience and been given lots of ideas and different perspectives. On top of that there is lots of great material available. This one is just under 9 minutes long but well worth the trouble. You will make up the 9 minutes the day you watch it.
 

via emergentfutures:

 Enterprises warm to social tools, but implementation is key - The Globe and Mail
Companies around the world are about to start using social media software internally to make their businesses better … and many aren’t sure how to measure success or failure.
I am not talking about companies using social media for external purposes. If a cheese company wants to start up a Facebook page or monitor its brand on Twitter there are buckets of tools for  measuring effectiveness. And the desired goals are pretty obvious –  usually something along the lines of “sell more cheese.”
When companies move toward “Enterprise 2.0” and adopt social media technologies for processes inside their business, things get murkier.
The  whole idea of measuring enterprise software is a recent thing. For  years, companies spent tens of millions of dollars on expensive  software. At the end of it, the CEO would ask the IT department “How did  it go?” When things went well, the IT folk would say “It was a success –  it came in on time and on budget.” Champagne for all!
However,  some particularly smart and crafty CEOs started asking follow up  questions like “Do our employees like the software? Are they more  productive? Are they even using it? And are we making more money?”

 Enterprises warm to social tools, but implementation is key - The Globe and Mail

Companies around the world are about to start using social media software internally to make their businesses better … and many aren’t sure how to measure success or failure.

I am not talking about companies using social media for external purposes. If a cheese company wants to start up a Facebook page or monitor its brand on Twitter there are buckets of tools for measuring effectiveness. And the desired goals are pretty obvious – usually something along the lines of “sell more cheese.”

When companies move toward “Enterprise 2.0” and adopt social media technologies for processes inside their business, things get murkier.

The whole idea of measuring enterprise software is a recent thing. For years, companies spent tens of millions of dollars on expensive software. At the end of it, the CEO would ask the IT department “How did it go?” When things went well, the IT folk would say “It was a success – it came in on time and on budget.” Champagne for all!

However, some particularly smart and crafty CEOs started asking follow up questions like “Do our employees like the software? Are they more productive? Are they even using it? And are we making more money?”