Iceland Is Crowdsourcing Its New Constitution  | GOOD
Vikings. They’re the vanguard of 21st-century democracy.
In  the wake of the devastating collapse of Iceland’s commercial banks, the  country is drawing up a new constitution, and it’s doing things a little  differently: It’s crowdsourcing the process. For real.
The  country’s 25-member constituional council is posting draft clauses on  its website and inviting the public to comment on them there or on its Facebook page. And their comments are actually being incorporated into the document. The council also has Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr accounts and is streaming all of its meetings live. It’s perhaps the  most open and participatory constitutional process in modern history  (the Greeks were pretty good at democracy in their time).
The draft Human Rights section currently contains an expansive clause barring descrimination for just  about any reason (including “genotype” and “social origin”) but also  guarantees universal mental and physical healthcare, academic freedom,  and the protection of natural resources. It’s shaping up to be a pretty  awesome document from what we can tell.
The council’s Facebook  page is full of comments, not only from Icelanders, but also  well-wishers from all over the globe. If you think this is as inspiring  an experiment as we do, drop by and tell them so.

Iceland Is Crowdsourcing Its New Constitution  | GOOD

Vikings. They’re the vanguard of 21st-century democracy.

In the wake of the devastating collapse of Iceland’s commercial banks, the country is drawing up a new constitution, and it’s doing things a little differently: It’s crowdsourcing the process. For real.

The country’s 25-member constituional council is posting draft clauses on its website and inviting the public to comment on them there or on its Facebook page. And their comments are actually being incorporated into the document. The council also has Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr accounts and is streaming all of its meetings live. It’s perhaps the most open and participatory constitutional process in modern history (the Greeks were pretty good at democracy in their time).

The draft Human Rights section currently contains an expansive clause barring descrimination for just about any reason (including “genotype” and “social origin”) but also guarantees universal mental and physical healthcare, academic freedom, and the protection of natural resources. It’s shaping up to be a pretty awesome document from what we can tell.

The council’s Facebook page is full of comments, not only from Icelanders, but also well-wishers from all over the globe. If you think this is as inspiring an experiment as we do, drop by and tell them so.

The Social Web’s Say on the State of the Union
Source: Mashable

Before, during and after U.S. President Barack Obama‘s 2011 State of the Union address last night, the social web was abuzz with political commentary. But what were we all talking about, and how do our tweets, posts and updates reflect on national sentiment about the President and the country’s general position?
Data gathered from Twitter (courtesy of Tweetbeat)and Facebook (courtesy of U.S. Politics on Facebook) paint an interesting picture. Americans are a politically chatty bunch, if nothing else, and their web-based public messages prove it.
In fact, tweets about the State of the Union address far outnumbered tweets about other events of the day, including tweets about the upcoming Super Bowl. Tweetbeat counted around 400,000 tweets about the State of the Union address, and 100,000 appeared in the first hour of the event itself.

The Social Web’s Say on the State of the Union

Source: Mashable

Before, during and after U.S. President Barack Obama‘s 2011 State of the Union address last night, the social web was abuzz with political commentary. But what were we all talking about, and how do our tweets, posts and updates reflect on national sentiment about the President and the country’s general position?

Data gathered from Twitter (courtesy of Tweetbeat)and Facebook (courtesy of U.S. Politics on Facebook) paint an interesting picture. Americans are a politically chatty bunch, if nothing else, and their web-based public messages prove it.

In fact, tweets about the State of the Union address far outnumbered tweets about other events of the day, including tweets about the upcoming Super Bowl. Tweetbeat counted around 400,000 tweets about the State of the Union address, and 100,000 appeared in the first hour of the event itself.

It’s No Game: DOD Uses Virtual Reality to Treat PTSD
In the blockbuster movie “Avatar,” virtual reality is used to return a physically disabled soldier back to a more normal life. The movie takes place in the distant future and is clearly science fiction. Even so, military psychologists are using virtual reality today to help Iraq War veterans recover from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Using the system, the medical professionals can re-create a combat situation such as an attack, an explosion or an ambush, and help the veteran work through the elements of that situation that triggered the stress. The system was developed as part of a joint effort that involved the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy and U.S. Army, along with the University of Southern California and the virtual reality development company Virtually Better Inc. Working together, the groups produced a system dubbed Virtual Iraq, which electronically re-creates Iraqi environments. The system uses graphics to deliver a video game-like display, as well as sounds and even smells, to help those suffering from PTSD revisit the events that affected them.

It’s No Game: DOD Uses Virtual Reality to Treat PTSD

In the blockbuster movie “Avatar,” virtual reality is used to return a physically disabled soldier back to a more normal life. The movie takes place in the distant future and is clearly science fiction. Even so, military psychologists are using virtual reality today to help Iraq War veterans recover from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Using the system, the medical professionals can re-create a combat situation such as an attack, an explosion or an ambush, and help the veteran work through the elements of that situation that triggered the stress. The system was developed as part of a joint effort that involved the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy and U.S. Army, along with the University of Southern California and the virtual reality development company Virtually Better Inc. Working together, the groups produced a system dubbed Virtual Iraq, which electronically re-creates Iraqi environments. The system uses graphics to deliver a video game-like display, as well as sounds and even smells, to help those suffering from PTSD revisit the events that affected them.