Trust is largely a social concept

The untapped value of complainers.  Even a single customer’s dissatisfaction and distrust can soon infect a large number of others. So complainers, if left to their own devices, can do immense damage to your brand. Fortunately, just as boiling water freezers faster than lukewarm, companies can transform their harshest critics into the most enthusiastic advocates.

Don Peppers via fastcompany.com

Social Business Predictions for 2012 « Dachis Group Collaboratory
It’s that time of year again. Enterprise social media has had an  impressive ramp-up in 2011 as well as being well-poised for a banner  year in 2012. However, along the way, social business has become a very  broad topic indeed, covering a wide range of topics that ranges from  social marketing and Social CRM to collaborative product development and  Enterprise 2.0, with a good number of specialty niches in between them  for good measure.  This includes social HR and talent management to social business intelligence and social business applications,  to list just some of them. It’s fair to say that in 2011, social  pervaded a truly wide swath of territory in terms of business  capabilities. While social reconceptions of traditional business  functions began showing signs of some maturity in select areas  (especially social marketing and internal collaboration), strong early  adoption was also a hallmark of a few quite recent developments, in  particular Social CRM.
Thus, with all this activity, it’s not surprising that it was at the  beginning of this year that some estimates of the total investment in  the social business industry exceeded $100 billion,  an impressive figure for an industry that’s just about five years old.   The big question for those now investing in and promoting social  business approaches in their organization is, namely, what’s coming  next? Are there any new major new insights that will reshape the field?   The examples of hard won lessons of years past, such as the need for  community management in most social business implementations or that  social business should be connected to the flow of work, have been  critical ones. What else have we learned?

Social Business Predictions for 2012 « Dachis Group Collaboratory

It’s that time of year again. Enterprise social media has had an impressive ramp-up in 2011 as well as being well-poised for a banner year in 2012. However, along the way, social business has become a very broad topic indeed, covering a wide range of topics that ranges from social marketing and Social CRM to collaborative product development and Enterprise 2.0, with a good number of specialty niches in between them for good measure. This includes social HR and talent management to social business intelligence and social business applications, to list just some of them. It’s fair to say that in 2011, social pervaded a truly wide swath of territory in terms of business capabilities. While social reconceptions of traditional business functions began showing signs of some maturity in select areas (especially social marketing and internal collaboration), strong early adoption was also a hallmark of a few quite recent developments, in particular Social CRM.

Thus, with all this activity, it’s not surprising that it was at the beginning of this year that some estimates of the total investment in the social business industry exceeded $100 billion, an impressive figure for an industry that’s just about five years old. The big question for those now investing in and promoting social business approaches in their organization is, namely, what’s coming next? Are there any new major new insights that will reshape the field? The examples of hard won lessons of years past, such as the need for community management in most social business implementations or that social business should be connected to the flow of work, have been critical ones. What else have we learned?

The Future of Social Customer Relationship Management | Mashable
Killian Schaffer is VP/Strategy Director, CRM for Cramer-Krasselt/Chicago. You can follow him on Twitter @kschaffs.
Currently there’s a lot of buzz around social customer relationship management (CRM). Social media platforms and technologies like Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare are transforming how companies market their products and engage audiences. But when you’re also concerned about delivering results to your clients, you’ll do well to study the evolution from traditional CRM to sCRM.
Like different forms of intelligence – abstract, practical, emotional – customer data reveals different value traits that help to assess each individual. Then we can develop programs to extract revenue from that data.
While “transactional” value has been a mainstay for decades, the web and its social media platforms have introduced new “relationship” and “influence” measures. The more comprehensive data complements CRM’s traditional indicators:
Transactional: Determines a consumer’s monetary value based on purchase recency, frequency and dollar amount. Database marketers have relied on these attributes for decades.
Relationship: Predicated on information sharing activity, the type and depth of information shared by consumers is directly related to their value to the brand.
Influence: Evaluates the consumer’s social potential as an “earned media partner” based on their publishing frequency and social graph responsiveness.
The seamless integration of what we call the “Value TRInity” — transaction, relationship and influence — will be the future of CRM.

The Future of Social Customer Relationship Management | Mashable

Killian Schaffer is VP/Strategy Director, CRM for Cramer-Krasselt/Chicago. You can follow him on Twitter @kschaffs.

Currently there’s a lot of buzz around social customer relationship management (CRM). Social media platforms and technologies like Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare are transforming how companies market their products and engage audiences. But when you’re also concerned about delivering results to your clients, you’ll do well to study the evolution from traditional CRM to sCRM.

Like different forms of intelligence – abstract, practical, emotional – customer data reveals different value traits that help to assess each individual. Then we can develop programs to extract revenue from that data.

While “transactional” value has been a mainstay for decades, the web and its social media platforms have introduced new “relationship” and “influence” measures. The more comprehensive data complements CRM’s traditional indicators:

  • Transactional: Determines a consumer’s monetary value based on purchase recency, frequency and dollar amount. Database marketers have relied on these attributes for decades.
  • Relationship: Predicated on information sharing activity, the type and depth of information shared by consumers is directly related to their value to the brand.
  • Influence: Evaluates the consumer’s social potential as an “earned media partner” based on their publishing frequency and social graph responsiveness.

The seamless integration of what we call the “Value TRInity” — transaction, relationship and influence — will be the future of CRM.

Work with your customers as if they were real relationships, not an entry in some database. This means not just knowing who they are but talking and treating them as you would a good friend. It is possible in small and large scale. The hard part is making that happen within the processes of your organization. This isn’t something simply for the support department to worry about; they just happen to get the brunt of it.

Smarter Commerce Briefing: Paul Papas in the Virtual Center | IBM Global Business Services

Catch the replay of the March 14 launch of IBM’s new Smarter Commerce initiative, with this first-of-a-kind live webcast from the IBM Virtual Center.

Paul Papas, a partner in IBM’s Global Business Services consulting organization, is the global leader of this new program. You can also watch the Q&A session from the briefing.

Finally, subscribe to the IBM Global Services Webcast feed to learn about upcoming events and to sample past topics.

via smarterplanet:

10 Smarter Enterprise Technologies That Will Have Big Impact in 2011

Source: Smarter Technology

The smartest place to be for a company, customer or entrepreneur is at the intersection of business needs and new technologies. Here are 10 projects I’ve been watching that I contend will have a big business impact this year.

Starbucks: No, not its new 30-ounce drinks, but its new payment system. Using a smartphone and scanner to pay for your Starbucks’ purchase is just the start of mobile payment systems in the United States.

Starbucks Card Mobile app (Source: Starbucks)

Social network-driven phone systems: Skype and Google let you choose your own number.  Google lets you choose which number will ring on which phones as well as provide speech to text translations of voicemail. Enterprise IT will decide it is better to join in, rather than fight the tide. Expect organizations to start building phone systems around such phone-in-the-cloud providers.

The next stage of CRM: Maintaining and evaluating customer contacts is still a big part of corporate IT. The success of companies such as Salesforce.com was built around taking balky CRM systems and moving them out to the cloud. The next stage is to manage all customer interactions including social networks. Startups such as Nimble have the right idea.

Smartphones in pinstripes: One phone with two faces. A consumer face and an enterprise face. Lots of talk about this one right now, but no real contenders yet.

The tablet app machine: Tablets are the new in thing, but except for Apple and some Android offerings, they are still mostly invisible in the enterprise. That will change as companies reorganize their development resources to address tablet applications.

(Read more on Smarter Technology)