Study shows long-term growth of communities comes from non-power contributors

We classified members of each WikiProject as either a power-user or non-power-user and compared the number of contributions made by power-users in the first year to those made by non-power-users. We found that: More contribution from non-power-users early in a project’s life leads to better long-term growth More contribution from power-users leads to slower long-term growth When power-users do too much early on, they may crowd out potential contributors and community members. Getting more people “in the door” in a community, even if they only make minimal contributions, makes the community more valuable and more productive in the long term. Online communities that seek growth should design their sites, policies, and incentives to encourage as many individuals as possible to join and make even minimal contributions.

(via Critical Mass of What? | Follow the Crowd)

Study shows long-term growth of communities comes from non-power contributors

We classified members of each WikiProject as either a power-user or non-power-user and compared the number of contributions made by power-users in the first year to those made by non-power-users. We found that: More contribution from non-power-users early in a project’s life leads to better long-term growth More contribution from power-users leads to slower long-term growth When power-users do too much early on, they may crowd out potential contributors and community members. Getting more people “in the door” in a community, even if they only make minimal contributions, makes the community more valuable and more productive in the long term. Online communities that seek growth should design their sites, policies, and incentives to encourage as many individuals as possible to join and make even minimal contributions.

(via Critical Mass of What? | Follow the Crowd)

Content needs to be personalized for consumption.
For example, Travelers, in partnership with The Weather Company, uses Facebook’s Open Graph to help insurance agents track people who might be in a storm’s path, and to share tips with those affected by bad or dangerous weather.
(via Content Cookie Monsters - Direct Marketing News)

Content needs to be personalized for consumption.

For example, Travelers, in partnership with The Weather Company, uses Facebook’s Open Graph to help insurance agents track people who might be in a storm’s path, and to share tips with those affected by bad or dangerous weather.

(via Content Cookie Monsters - Direct Marketing News)

Do people read what they tweet? Don’t assume they have looked any farther than the headline and lead . A study correlated how far people scrolled through an article with the number of tweets from the article. The relationship proved to be fairly weak.
(via How people read online: Why you won’t finish this article. - Slate Magazine)

Do people read what they tweet? Don’t assume they have looked any farther than the headline and lead . A study correlated how far people scrolled through an article with the number of tweets from the article. The relationship proved to be fairly weak.

(via How people read online: Why you won’t finish this article. - Slate Magazine)

Envisioning a content management hub. One of 9 capabilities discussed in this article, and a very important one, is democracy — everyone within an organization, and customers as well, should be able to recommend information for inclusion in the hub. Via Forrester Blogs

Envisioning a content management hub. One of 9 capabilities discussed in this article, and a very important one, is democracy — everyone within an organization, and customers as well, should be able to recommend information for inclusion in the hub. Via Forrester Blogs

Meet the ‘bots’ that edit Wikipedia. They perform a wide range of editorial and administrative tasks that are tedious, repetitive and time-consuming but vital.They delete vandalism and foul language, organise and catalogue entries, and handle the reams of behind-the-scenes work that keep the encyclopaedia running smoothly and efficiently and keep its appearance neat and uniform in style.
In brick-and-mortar library terms, bots are akin to the students who shelve books, move stacks from one range to another, affix bar codes to book spines and perform other grunt tasks that allow the trained librarians to concentrate on acquisitions and policy.Via BBC News 

Meet the ‘bots’ that edit Wikipedia. They perform a wide range of editorial and administrative tasks that are tedious, repetitive and time-consuming but vital.They delete vandalism and foul language, organise and catalogue entries, and handle the reams of behind-the-scenes work that keep the encyclopaedia running smoothly and efficiently and keep its appearance neat and uniform in style.

In brick-and-mortar library terms, bots are akin to the students who shelve books, move stacks from one range to another, affix bar codes to book spines and perform other grunt tasks that allow the trained librarians to concentrate on acquisitions and policy.Via BBC News