Better medicine, brought to you by big data — Cloud Computing News
Slowly but surely, health care is becoming a killer app for big data. Whether it’s Hadoop, machine learning, natural-language processing or some other technique, folks in the worlds of medicine and hospital administration understand that new types of data analysis are the key to helping them take their fields to the next level.
Image source

Better medicine, brought to you by big data — Cloud Computing News

Slowly but surely, health care is becoming a killer app for big data. Whether it’s Hadoop, machine learning, natural-language processing or some other technique, folks in the worlds of medicine and hospital administration understand that new types of data analysis are the key to helping them take their fields to the next level.

Image source

Ford Taps Cloud-Based Prediction Market

The cloud-based system from Inkling helps Ford Motor decide which new ideas are worth pursuing. Would you like an in-car vacuum?

Source: InternetNews.com

Ford Motor Company’s stock price on the New York Stock Exchange has almost doubled in the past year, but that’s not the only stock market the company has interest in. The car maker is also tapping a cloud-based prediction market system to get a better handle on which new ideas to pursue.

The simulated stock market, being used by more than 1,300 Ford employees in the United States and Europe, encourages members to comment on various topics and issues through stock market-like trading. Ford is using a cloud-based collaborative prediction platform offered by Inkling, which has a number of other blue-chip clients in its stable, including CNN, Cisco, General Mills and Johnson & Johnson.

Tom Montgomery, a technical expert with Ford’s Research & Advanced Engineering group, said Ford first developed its own predictions market software in 2006, but moved to Inkling in 2009. “It’s their software and theirservers, they host everything, but we brand the interface,” Montgomery toldInternetNews.com. “The important thing for us is that the information we collect is proprietary and they offered the security and guarantees we wanted.”

Ford said it is testing the predictions market system as an adjunct to traditional customer research, which is more time consuming and expensive. Participants have “traded” on such items as potential new car features and topics like sales volume, electrification and economic issues such as gas and commodity prices. The system posts questions for traders, asking them to select an answer and then handicap the chances of that choice being rated highest.

 IBM Brings Social Business to the Cloud, Mobile Devices

“A shift is occurring in the enterprise. The adoption of social software is rapidly becoming a vital business tool, enabling organizations to transform virtually every part of their business operations from marketing, customer service and sales, to product development and human resources. Social business offers the world of possibility that occurs when all of the energy and opportunities that have been generated around consumer models, such as Facebook and Twitter, are focused, and brought to bear on business challenges.”

via horizonwatching:

smarterplanet:

IBM Builds NATO a Private Cloud for Intelligence Work | Fast Company
Now IBM is easing NATO’s IT operations in Virginia into a private cloud that could eventually help the organization smooth out command, control, surveillance, and intelligence projects, and improve decision-making on the ground. “Cloud computing is ideally suited for [NATO]. It takes the disparate capabilities of 28 nations and brings them together in an efficient, effective, and less costly fashion than might otherwise be the case,” explains Ernest J. Herold, the NATO account manager for IBM global business services. The Virginia center, Herold says, is oriented towards setting standards for the military forces of alliance. Cloud computing could “test, evaluate, configure and reconfigure different technological capabilities to see how they work together.”  

smarterplanet:

IBM Builds NATO a Private Cloud for Intelligence Work | Fast Company


Now IBM is easing NATO’s IT operations in Virginia into a private cloud that could eventually help the organization smooth out command, control, surveillance, and intelligence projects, and improve decision-making on the ground. “Cloud computing is ideally suited for [NATO]. It takes the disparate capabilities of 28 nations and brings them together in an efficient, effective, and less costly fashion than might otherwise be the case,” explains Ernest J. Herold, the NATO account manager for IBM global business services. The Virginia center, Herold says, is oriented towards setting standards for the military forces of alliance. Cloud computing could “test, evaluate, configure and reconfigure different technological capabilities to see how they work together.”  

A new survey reveals CEOs view their IT departments as the best thing they have going when it comes to innovation.

Want innovation? Look no further than IT, say CEOs | ZDNet

A Harris Interactive survey of the attitudes of 304 Fortune 1000 executives toward enterprise innovation.  IT is viewed as having been the most innovative function within executives’ own companies during the past 10 years (44 percent), beating customer service, marketing and sales.

(via smarterplanet)

(via smarterplanet)