We are entering an era where marketers are particularly well suited to make it into the top job.

Ashley Friedlein

C-suite members are spending more of their time personally on customer experience management and e-commerce and proportionally less on things like the supply chain, risk, partner management, security and operations.

The CEO role has never been so accessible for marketers | Opinion | Marketing Week

6 rules for creating content that resonates with busy C-Suite execs
Drive credibility with hard fact. Data based on peer-based insights and stories adds to  credibility.
Provide timely information on issues that matter. There needs to be a “so what” that is up to the minute on topics relevant to the executive’s business, role, and current challenges.
Summarize, summarize, summarize. Deliver your ideas with targeted summaries and succinct points, where the bottom-line ideas and actions are easy to extract and consume.
Channel matters. Content has to be easy to access everywhere— during a flight when they are on the iPad, after dinner with a printed paper, or while waiting for a meeting when they have two minutes to watch a video.
Push beyond common wisdom and top-of-mind trends. Present a provocative vision for future possibilities. Executives seek intriguing, surprising, or useful ideas that highlight future opportunities in areas that tie to their greatest business challenges.
Be strategic, not technical. Executives care about how they can solve business problems and enhance revenue and profit. They are not interested in reading about technologies and products — those are only a means to the end and are readily delegated to others to review and purchase.



(via Designing Your Content Plan to Speak to the C-Suite - Business 2 Community)

6 rules for creating content that resonates with busy C-Suite execs

  • Drive credibility with hard fact. Data based on peer-based insights and stories adds to  credibility.
  • Provide timely information on issues that matter. There needs to be a “so what” that is up to the minute on topics relevant to the executive’s business, role, and current challenges.
  • Summarize, summarize, summarize. Deliver your ideas with targeted summaries and succinct points, where the bottom-line ideas and actions are easy to extract and consume.
  • Channel matters. Content has to be easy to access everywhere— during a flight when they are on the iPad, after dinner with a printed paper, or while waiting for a meeting when they have two minutes to watch a video.
  • Push beyond common wisdom and top-of-mind trends. Present a provocative vision for future possibilities. Executives seek intriguing, surprising, or useful ideas that highlight future opportunities in areas that tie to their greatest business challenges.
  • Be strategic, not technical. Executives care about how they can solve business problems and enhance revenue and profit. They are not interested in reading about technologies and products — those are only a means to the end and are readily delegated to others to review and purchase.

(via Designing Your Content Plan to Speak to the C-Suite - Business 2 Community)


CEOs rank technology factors above all other external forces in shaping their organization’s future. CMOs and CIOs rank market factors first. Who’s right? Well, customer-obsession says that you are all right. Customers come first. So CMOs and CIOs are right. And only business technology — which we define as “technology, systems, and processes to win, serve, and retain customers” can help you acknowledge your customers’ power and surpass their expectations. So CEOs are right, too. Maybe more right ;-).

IBM’s Global CxO Study Shows That You Irrefutably Live In The Age Of The Customer
(via  Gartner VP and Senior Analyst Ted Schadler- Forbes)

CEOs rank technology factors above all other external forces in shaping their organization’s future. CMOs and CIOs rank market factors first. Who’s right? Well, customer-obsession says that you are all right. Customers come first. So CMOs and CIOs are right. And only business technology — which we define as “technology, systems, and processes to win, serve, and retain customers” can help you acknowledge your customers’ power and surpass their expectations. So CEOs are right, too. Maybe more right ;-).

IBM’s Global CxO Study Shows That You Irrefutably Live In The Age Of The Customer

(via  Gartner VP and Senior Analyst Ted Schadler- Forbes)

The customer-activated enterprise. A new C-suite study from IBM finds that more than half of CxOs expect to open up their enterprises – bringing down barriers to extend collaboration inside and outside. CEOs said customers come second only to the C-suite in terms of the strategic influence they wield. They expect a radical shift in what it means to collaborate with customers.

(via IBM Insights from the IBM Global C-suite Study)

76% of global executives say they want their CEO to engage in social media, as Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer does —  to share company news and information, have a positive impact on company reputation and business results, and communicate more directly with employees, customers, and other key stakeholders.
(via Social Media Finally Seen As Essential for CEOs - Forbes)

76% of global executives say they want their CEO to engage in social media, as Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer does — to share company news and information, have a positive impact on company reputation and business results, and communicate more directly with employees, customers, and other key stakeholders.

(via Social Media Finally Seen As Essential for CEOs - Forbes)


Video is the Social CEO HotspotMore than ever, CEOs are using video to promote their company narratives and connect. In  2010, video was used by only 18 percent of CEOs. Today, the rate of video usage has more than doubled, with 40 percent of CEOs now appearing in corporate videos. Growth in video is nearly evenly divided between CEOs appearing in videos on company websites and on corporate YouTube channels. 

via Weber Shandwick

Video is the Social CEO Hotspot
More than ever, CEOs are using video to promote their company narratives and connect. In  2010, video was used by only 18 percent of CEOs. Today, the rate of video usage has more than doubled, with 40 percent of CEOs now appearing in corporate videos. Growth in video is nearly evenly divided between CEOs appearing in videos on company websites and on corporate YouTube channels. 

via Weber Shandwick

The C-Suite. We know who they are, but do we really know what they do? In the era of empowered employees, the chief executives are either working for you or against you.  First in a series, this article features the CEO and insights from IBM’s CEO Study (via Meet the C-Suite: Understanding Their Impact on Social Business)

The C-Suite. We know who they are, but do we really know what they do? In the era of empowered employees, the chief executives are either working for you or against you.  First in a series, this article features the CEO and insights from IBM’s CEO Study (via Meet the C-Suite: Understanding Their Impact on Social Business)