At MIT-Sloan symposium: CIOs more guarded than academics

Two back-to-back panels explored what it takes to successfully transition to the untethered enterprise, one consisting of academics, and one of CIOs. Not surprisingly, each of these panels viewed the opportunities and challenges through somewhat different lenses.

The academic panel talked about the need to be entrepreneurial and move quickly to try out new ideas in the marketplace. Agility beats strategy every time. Marketplace experimentation is very important, and it is the right way to make decisions as to what works and what does not. Top down strategy plans take too long to formulate and generally don’t work so well because technologies and markets are changing so fast. With digital platforms, cloud and other such capabilities, the cost of experimentation is much lower than in the past, whereas the cost of missed opportunities is very high. Companies need to embrace this culture of agility.

The CIO panel was more guarded. While they agreed that agility and experimentation were very important, they viewed them more as aspirational objectives that were not always practical given existing investments and commitments. Unlike the academic panel, the CIOs emphasized the need for ROI analysis and careful planning, especially when considering big technology bets. Stitching together the overall infrastructure to support a variety of cloud services and mobile devices requires discipline, otherwise things will not work or there might be serious security and quality breakdowns. A recurring theme across the two panels was the impact of legacy infrastructures on the evolution toward the untethered enterprise. ”

How Any Company Can Think Like A Startup | Fast Company
Common wisdom states that startups are hothouses for creativity and innovation, while large corporations are too jammed up with bureaucracy and hierarchy to push the envelope and arrive at new solutions. It’s why more and more companies are trying to “think like a startup,” some even forming smaller divisions that can operate more nimbly and loosely within the larger structure.
But is it that simple? Is simply being small and new a recipe for creative thinking, and if so, what happens when a startup gets bigger, and older (presumably everyone’s goal)? How can we define what’s working so well at the startup level, in order to cement these principles as part of a company culture that can be maintained throughout growth? 
My branding and design consultancy works almost exclusively with startups, but in my previous life as a brand planner at large global advertising agencies working on multinational clients, I had my share of exposure to how the “other side” operates. And I actually think that when it comes to fostering new ideas and strong creative work—internally or when working with an outside agency—both sides of the scale can learn from each other. So let’s start with the startups, and what they’re doing right.   
1. Startups are flatter. 

How Any Company Can Think Like A Startup | Fast Company

Common wisdom states that startups are hothouses for creativity and innovation, while large corporations are too jammed up with bureaucracy and hierarchy to push the envelope and arrive at new solutions. It’s why more and more companies are trying to “think like a startup,” some even forming smaller divisions that can operate more nimbly and loosely within the larger structure.

But is it that simple? Is simply being small and new a recipe for creative thinking, and if so, what happens when a startup gets bigger, and older (presumably everyone’s goal)? How can we define what’s working so well at the startup level, in order to cement these principles as part of a company culture that can be maintained throughout growth? 

My branding and design consultancy works almost exclusively with startups, but in my previous life as a brand planner at large global advertising agencies working on multinational clients, I had my share of exposure to how the “other side” operates. And I actually think that when it comes to fostering new ideas and strong creative work—internally or when working with an outside agency—both sides of the scale can learn from each other. So let’s start with the startups, and what they’re doing right.   

1. Startups are flatter. 

Your aspiration: As a Chief Information Officer, drive change, innovation and efficiency to help build a smarter enterprise that will prosper amidst global competition. Your daily challenge: As a Chief Information Officer, deliver business results faster and better–with less.