Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code
Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.
The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.
In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.
“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”
Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code

Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.

The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.

In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.

“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”

Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

(via smarterplanet)

APIs are about to scale in physical environments.
The ecosystem has been integral to wearables from day one. It is finding its way into finance – beyond payments where PayPal has been working with its ecosystem for three years – into innovation practices and the Internet of Things. That means it is primed for the broader manufacturing sector.
(via How The Smartphone Ecosystem Model Will Disrupt Business Everywhere)

APIs are about to scale in physical environments.

The ecosystem has been integral to wearables from day one. It is finding its way into finance – beyond payments where PayPal has been working with its ecosystem for three years – into innovation practices and the Internet of Things. That means it is primed for the broader manufacturing sector.

(via How The Smartphone Ecosystem Model Will Disrupt Business Everywhere)

The new [Facebook mobile ad]] network also opens up the possibility of being able to do true cross-screen frequency and reach, to know that you’ll reach someone a certain amount of times on mobile versus desktop specifically, instead of just knowing that you’ve reached them a few times on various screens.

The wisdom of the tribes

The first generation of social media touted “networking”, but the next generation, raised in always-on connectivity, will embrace ephemerality and digital tribalism. Those users will abandon the major social networks and migrate to more granular mobile villages with simpler ecosystems.

(via The Future Of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes – ReadWrite)

The wisdom of the tribes

The first generation of social media touted “networking”, but the next generation, raised in always-on connectivity, will embrace ephemerality and digital tribalism. Those users will abandon the major social networks and migrate to more granular mobile villages with simpler ecosystems.

(via The Future Of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes – ReadWrite)

Digital is winning, even inside the studios.

Anne Thompson, author of The $11 Billion Year

The motion picture CEOs aren’t stupid… While they may be hanging on tight to the old ways so that they can grab as much short-term cash as possible via top-down models that manipulate consumers by telling them what to buy, they know the ground under their feet is unstable. In order to survive they will have to learn to listen to their customers, find out what they want and how to best serve them. The old strategies in the movie business are disintegrating, as the ownership model gives way to one that is all about access. Adapt or die.

How “Breaking Bad” and “House of Cards” killed the Oscars - Salon.com

… high-end shopping mall DLF Promenade in the City [New Delhi] performs real-time analytics to convert data gathered from shopper’s movements in the mall to provide meaningful interactions for smartphone users…

once a user opts-in for the service, the solution performs analytics to understand consumer preferences based on location and interests in order to provide customised services via a mobile app.

DLF will also use the solution to allow retailers in the mall to extend sales deals to shoppers via the app, based on footfall heat maps.

Via Economic Times, India


Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank
Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.
(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank

Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.

(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

theatlantic:

Sit Back, Relax, And Read That Long Story — on Your Phone

Earlier this month, Buzzfeed published a story called “Why I Bought a House in Detroit for $500.” It ended up getting more than a million pageviews, which is notable because the story is also more than 6,000 words long. The other notable thing: 47 percent of those views came from people accessing the story on mobile devices. And while people who read the piece on tablets spent an average of more than 12 minutes with the story, those doing so on phones  spent more than 25 minutes—a small eternity, in Internet time. 
Those stats are, if not counterintuitive, then counter-conventional: The working assumption, among media executives and most of the public who cares about such things, has long been that phones are best suited for quick-hit stories and tweets rather than immersive, longform reads. And while content producers have attempted to take advantage of the “lean-back” capabilities of the tablet (see, for example, tablet-optimized products like The Atavist), phone use has generally been seen as flitting and fleeting—the stuff of grocery store lines and bus rides. ”The average mobile reader tends to skim through headlines and snackable content as opposed to diving into long-form articles,” Mobile Marketer put it in late October. 
Read more. [Image: kgnixer/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Sit Back, Relax, And Read That Long Story — on Your Phone

Earlier this month, Buzzfeed published a story called “Why I Bought a House in Detroit for $500.” It ended up getting more than a million pageviews, which is notable because the story is also more than 6,000 words long. The other notable thing: 47 percent of those views came from people accessing the story on mobile devices. And while people who read the piece on tablets spent an average of more than 12 minutes with the story, those doing so on phones  spent more than 25 minutes—a small eternity, in Internet time. 

Those stats are, if not counterintuitive, then counter-conventional: The working assumption, among media executives and most of the public who cares about such things, has long been that phones are best suited for quick-hit stories and tweets rather than immersive, longform reads. And while content producers have attempted to take advantage of the “lean-back” capabilities of the tablet (see, for example, tablet-optimized products like The Atavist), phone use has generally been seen as flitting and fleeting—the stuff of grocery store lines and bus rides. ”The average mobile reader tends to skim through headlines and snackable content as opposed to diving into long-form articles,” Mobile Marketer put it in late October.

Read more. [Image: kgnixer/Flickr]

Online shoe retailer Zappos is experiencing a surge sales from customers using Android-based smartphones. 
Recognizing the importance of designing platform-specific experiences for its native apps, the company devotes a separate team for iOS and Android. Each team consists of fans of that specific device and their expertise leads to more appropriate executions. Examples of Android-specific features:
 a widget that tracks a shipment on your home screen without having to open up the app, log-in and find the item.
 a smartphone screensaver that displays the time and weather on top of a Zappos product matched to the current weather.
(via Zappos sees Android conversions on the rise with catered UI - Mobile Commerce Daily - Strategy)

Online shoe retailer Zappos is experiencing a surge sales from customers using Android-based smartphones. 

Recognizing the importance of designing platform-specific experiences for its native apps, the company devotes a separate team for iOS and Android. Each team consists of fans of that specific device and their expertise leads to more appropriate executions. Examples of Android-specific features:

  •  a widget that tracks a shipment on your home screen without having to open up the app, log-in and find the item.
  •  a smartphone screensaver that displays the time and weather on top of a Zappos product matched to the current weather.

(via Zappos sees Android conversions on the rise with catered UI - Mobile Commerce Daily - Strategy)