The wisdom of the tribes

The first generation of social media touted “networking”, but the next generation, raised in always-on connectivity, will embrace ephemerality and digital tribalism. Those users will abandon the major social networks and migrate to more granular mobile villages with simpler ecosystems.

(via The Future Of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes – ReadWrite)

The wisdom of the tribes

The first generation of social media touted “networking”, but the next generation, raised in always-on connectivity, will embrace ephemerality and digital tribalism. Those users will abandon the major social networks and migrate to more granular mobile villages with simpler ecosystems.

(via The Future Of Social Media Is Mobile Tribes – ReadWrite)

Digital is winning, even inside the studios.

Anne Thompson, author of The $11 Billion Year

The motion picture CEOs aren’t stupid… While they may be hanging on tight to the old ways so that they can grab as much short-term cash as possible via top-down models that manipulate consumers by telling them what to buy, they know the ground under their feet is unstable. In order to survive they will have to learn to listen to their customers, find out what they want and how to best serve them. The old strategies in the movie business are disintegrating, as the ownership model gives way to one that is all about access. Adapt or die.

How “Breaking Bad” and “House of Cards” killed the Oscars - Salon.com

… high-end shopping mall DLF Promenade in the City [New Delhi] performs real-time analytics to convert data gathered from shopper’s movements in the mall to provide meaningful interactions for smartphone users…

once a user opts-in for the service, the solution performs analytics to understand consumer preferences based on location and interests in order to provide customised services via a mobile app.

DLF will also use the solution to allow retailers in the mall to extend sales deals to shoppers via the app, based on footfall heat maps.

Via Economic Times, India


Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank
Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.
(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank

Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.

(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

theatlantic:

Sit Back, Relax, And Read That Long Story — on Your Phone

Earlier this month, Buzzfeed published a story called “Why I Bought a House in Detroit for $500.” It ended up getting more than a million pageviews, which is notable because the story is also more than 6,000 words long. The other notable thing: 47 percent of those views came from people accessing the story on mobile devices. And while people who read the piece on tablets spent an average of more than 12 minutes with the story, those doing so on phones  spent more than 25 minutes—a small eternity, in Internet time. 
Those stats are, if not counterintuitive, then counter-conventional: The working assumption, among media executives and most of the public who cares about such things, has long been that phones are best suited for quick-hit stories and tweets rather than immersive, longform reads. And while content producers have attempted to take advantage of the “lean-back” capabilities of the tablet (see, for example, tablet-optimized products like The Atavist), phone use has generally been seen as flitting and fleeting—the stuff of grocery store lines and bus rides. ”The average mobile reader tends to skim through headlines and snackable content as opposed to diving into long-form articles,” Mobile Marketer put it in late October. 
Read more. [Image: kgnixer/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Sit Back, Relax, And Read That Long Story — on Your Phone

Earlier this month, Buzzfeed published a story called “Why I Bought a House in Detroit for $500.” It ended up getting more than a million pageviews, which is notable because the story is also more than 6,000 words long. The other notable thing: 47 percent of those views came from people accessing the story on mobile devices. And while people who read the piece on tablets spent an average of more than 12 minutes with the story, those doing so on phones  spent more than 25 minutes—a small eternity, in Internet time. 

Those stats are, if not counterintuitive, then counter-conventional: The working assumption, among media executives and most of the public who cares about such things, has long been that phones are best suited for quick-hit stories and tweets rather than immersive, longform reads. And while content producers have attempted to take advantage of the “lean-back” capabilities of the tablet (see, for example, tablet-optimized products like The Atavist), phone use has generally been seen as flitting and fleeting—the stuff of grocery store lines and bus rides. ”The average mobile reader tends to skim through headlines and snackable content as opposed to diving into long-form articles,” Mobile Marketer put it in late October.

Read more. [Image: kgnixer/Flickr]

Online shoe retailer Zappos is experiencing a surge sales from customers using Android-based smartphones. 
Recognizing the importance of designing platform-specific experiences for its native apps, the company devotes a separate team for iOS and Android. Each team consists of fans of that specific device and their expertise leads to more appropriate executions. Examples of Android-specific features:
 a widget that tracks a shipment on your home screen without having to open up the app, log-in and find the item.
 a smartphone screensaver that displays the time and weather on top of a Zappos product matched to the current weather.
(via Zappos sees Android conversions on the rise with catered UI - Mobile Commerce Daily - Strategy)

Online shoe retailer Zappos is experiencing a surge sales from customers using Android-based smartphones. 

Recognizing the importance of designing platform-specific experiences for its native apps, the company devotes a separate team for iOS and Android. Each team consists of fans of that specific device and their expertise leads to more appropriate executions. Examples of Android-specific features:

  •  a widget that tracks a shipment on your home screen without having to open up the app, log-in and find the item.
  •  a smartphone screensaver that displays the time and weather on top of a Zappos product matched to the current weather.

(via Zappos sees Android conversions on the rise with catered UI - Mobile Commerce Daily - Strategy)

Just announced — IBM Watson Group
The new division, based in New York City’s Silicon Alley, will have about 2,000 employees focused on software, services, research, experts and sales people.
IBM Watson Discovery Advisor is aimed at pharmaceutical, publishing and education research. The promise here is that Watson will wade through search results to deliver data and context faster for researchers.
IBM Watson Analytics Advisor is designed to be used by enterprises to send questions and raw data sets to Watson and allow the system to deliver insight.
(via IBM forms Watson Business Group: Will commercialization follow? | ZDNet)

Just announced — IBM Watson Group

The new division, based in New York City’s Silicon Alley, will have about 2,000 employees focused on software, services, research, experts and sales people.

  • IBM Watson Discovery Advisor is aimed at pharmaceutical, publishing and education research. The promise here is that Watson will wade through search results to deliver data and context faster for researchers.
  • IBM Watson Analytics Advisor is designed to be used by enterprises to send questions and raw data sets to Watson and allow the system to deliver insight.

(via IBM forms Watson Business Group: Will commercialization follow? | ZDNet)

Going from home to their car to work, there is no reason why someone should hear the same story three to four times a day. And if someone is not interested in a particular story, there’s no reason why they should have to listen to it.

-Zach Brand, NPR VP of digital media

The radio broadcaster’s new app, now in development, will tailor content based on an individuals location, tastes and preferences.

MediaPost Publications NPR Kicks Off Major Digital Transformation 12/17/2013

Proprietary app stores are stifling innovation
Proprietary app stores from Apple and Google are today’s version of CompuServe and AOL — walled gardens stopping the spread of digital content and ideas. The history of the Web suggests that these walls need to come down. 
(via Only Openness Frees Digital Innovation | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

Proprietary app stores are stifling innovation

Proprietary app stores from Apple and Google are today’s version of CompuServe and AOL — walled gardens stopping the spread of digital content and ideas. The history of the Web suggests that these walls need to come down. 

(via Only Openness Frees Digital Innovation | Innovation Insights | Wired.com)

Watson cognitive computing for a shopping app
An app for the iPad by Fluid, powered by IBM’s Watson, will help shoppers find and select the right outdoor gear for their travel needs. Going far beyond Google and Siri, it understands context and engages the shopper in conversation.
(via Customer Service - IBM’s Watson computer helps shoppers via a new app - Internet Retailer)

Watson cognitive computing for a shopping app

An app for the iPad by Fluid, powered by IBM’s Watson, will help shoppers find and select the right outdoor gear for their travel needs. Going far beyond Google and Siri, it understands context and engages the shopper in conversation.

(via Customer Service - IBM’s Watson computer helps shoppers via a new app - Internet Retailer)