Analyzing conversations for gender dominance Scientists who analyze social networks have applied the Bechdel test of gender roles in movies to digital networks.

While MySpace showed a balanced male and female scores, Twitter showed a very clear male bias that makes it closer to movies that do not pass the test than to those that pass it.

To pass the test, conversation must include same-sex dialogue about something other than the opposite sex.
(via The Bechdel Test of Social Media | Follow the Crowd)

Analyzing conversations for gender dominance

Scientists who analyze social networks have applied the Bechdel test of gender roles in movies to digital networks.

While MySpace showed a balanced male and female scores, Twitter showed a very clear male bias that makes it closer to movies that do not pass the test than to those that pass it.

To pass the test, conversation must include same-sex dialogue about something other than the opposite sex.

(via The Bechdel Test of Social Media | Follow the Crowd)

What do social media experts do all day?

… [the] crowded free-for-all for eyeballs is the driving factor for an entire industry of social media professionals, a group of internet-savvy, primarily young people charged with mastering media that are so new, most colleges don’t even offer courses on how to use them.
But what these attention wranglers actually do all day remains something of a mystery to those who don’t work in the industry. After all, the allure of social media is that it’s open to anyone who wants to participate. How, then, does one differentiate between an expert and the more than 800 million amateurs who log into Facebook each day?
… while the actual act of pushing out a tweet or posting something on Facebook takes a relatively short period of time, social media managers spend countless hours monitoring the internet in search of trends to chat about and customer comments in need of response.

 (via Huge Social Media Manager Does All Day - Business Insider)

What do social media experts do all day?

… [the] crowded free-for-all for eyeballs is the driving factor for an entire industry of social media professionals, a group of internet-savvy, primarily young people charged with mastering media that are so new, most colleges don’t even offer courses on how to use them.

But what these attention wranglers actually do all day remains something of a mystery to those who don’t work in the industry. After all, the allure of social media is that it’s open to anyone who wants to participate. How, then, does one differentiate between an expert and the more than 800 million amateurs who log into Facebook each day?

… while the actual act of pushing out a tweet or posting something on Facebook takes a relatively short period of time, social media managers spend countless hours monitoring the internet in search of trends to chat about and customer comments in need of response.


(via Huge Social Media Manager Does All Day - Business Insider)

Combining technology with human expertise
"Create websites and content for humans. Don’t do it for Google. Google is the machine part, and wants to find the right answer for people. If we create good content for humans, we trust that Google will be good at matching that up. [Marketers] get lost in the shortcuts while looking for a silver bullet. In 2014, a silver bullet doesn’t exist. You just have to use your brain and intuition to build unique, relevant content that people want to share."  —Mike Mothner, Wpromote
(via Beyond Big Data: Why Human Interpretation Still Counts | Fox Small Business Center)

Combining technology with human expertise

"Create websites and content for humans. Don’t do it for Google. Google is the machine part, and wants to find the right answer for people. If we create good content for humans, we trust that Google will be good at matching that up. [Marketers] get lost in the shortcuts while looking for a silver bullet. In 2014, a silver bullet doesn’t exist. You just have to use your brain and intuition to build unique, relevant content that people want to share."
—Mike Mothner, Wpromote

(via Beyond Big Data: Why Human Interpretation Still Counts | Fox Small Business Center)

B2B as  foundation for B2C social networks

A company’s social business network comprises all the underlying social network relationships, beginning with a company’s employees at the center and extending out to include a company’s customers, vendors and investors on the next circle out, then a company’s prospects, partners, competitors, as well as your industry’s influencers, press, associations and so forth to create the complete social network the industry’s ecosystem.
Without the foundation of a strong social business network, B2C companies cannot engage in meaningful social dialogue or manage the social conversation around their brands. However, relationships that comprise a company’s social business network are best established in a business context. Your employees can’t just come crashing in on a customer’s conversation about family and friends. Creating and scaling a true B2C social business network of company-consumer relationships is the fundamental B2C social media challenge.

(via The Social Business Network)

B2B as  foundation for B2C social networks

A company’s social business network comprises all the underlying social network relationships, beginning with a company’s employees at the center and extending out to include a company’s customers, vendors and investors on the next circle out, then a company’s prospects, partners, competitors, as well as your industry’s influencers, press, associations and so forth to create the complete social network the industry’s ecosystem.

Without the foundation of a strong social business network, B2C companies cannot engage in meaningful social dialogue or manage the social conversation around their brands. However, relationships that comprise a company’s social business network are best established in a business context. Your employees can’t just come crashing in on a customer’s conversation about family and friends. Creating and scaling a true B2C social business network of company-consumer relationships is the fundamental B2C social media challenge.

(via The Social Business Network)

What are the implications of the networked company for marketers?

Jen Evans, marketing futurist

A very efficient virtuous marketing cycle is created that is also largely self-sustaining: optimization is still necessary, but marketing operations and communications elements, once set up, require less strategic focus and more engagement, communication, analysis and program optimization.

Op-Ed: Is ‘social business’ dead or alive?

"Parent" brands systematize customer engagement
In consumer products, where many brands co-exist under one corporate umbrella, it’s especially critical for  marketing and technology to work together to influence customer experience across all brands and channels. Some examples:
Proctor & Gamble. Consolidation in the retail industry has adversely affected P&G’s pricing and profitability. In response, P&G consolidated many of its brands marketing into the “Proud Sponsor of Moms” campaign – leveraging not only their scale, but a common communications platform and positioning. The campaign helps drive consumer preference for P&G brands in jumbo-retailers such as Wal-Mart and Target.
Coca-Cola. Untapped customer information resulted in Coca Cola elevating data and insight into individual customers as a key priority. In partnership with IBM Interactive, Coca Cola is leveraging its My Coke Rewards program to develop one-on-one experiences deepening the relationship with consumers, including its popular “Share a Coke” program that lets customers have their own name in Coke’s iconic script on their Coke cans and bottles.
Hilton Hotels. Self-cannibalization led Hilton into focusing its marketing investment on its parent and HHonors brand. The parent brand wanted to avoid having its 9 individual hotel brands compete for the same marketing dollars to  target the same customer. Hilton is now working more collaboratively  in a more consolidated messaging and contact strategy.
(via Taking Back the Customer Relationship | IBM Interactive)

"Parent" brands systematize customer engagement

In consumer products, where many brands co-exist under one corporate umbrella, it’s especially critical for  marketing and technology to work together to influence customer experience across all brands and channels. Some examples:

Proctor & Gamble. Consolidation in the retail industry has adversely affected P&G’s pricing and profitability. In response, P&G consolidated many of its brands marketing into the “Proud Sponsor of Moms” campaign – leveraging not only their scale, but a common communications platform and positioning. The campaign helps drive consumer preference for P&G brands in jumbo-retailers such as Wal-Mart and Target.

Coca-Cola. Untapped customer information resulted in Coca Cola elevating data and insight into individual customers as a key priority. In partnership with IBM Interactive, Coca Cola is leveraging its My Coke Rewards program to develop one-on-one experiences deepening the relationship with consumers, including its popular “Share a Coke” program that lets customers have their own name in Coke’s iconic script on their Coke cans and bottles.

Hilton Hotels. Self-cannibalization led Hilton into focusing its marketing investment on its parent and HHonors brand. The parent brand wanted to avoid having its 9 individual hotel brands compete for the same marketing dollars to  target the same customer. Hilton is now working more collaboratively  in a more consolidated messaging and contact strategy.

(via Taking Back the Customer Relationship | IBM Interactive)

Much of the apprehension that businesses are experiencing today is a direct result of a lack of focus on innovation. For many CIOs, too much of the past decade has been spent on industrializing IT to drive down its cost. That industrialization process, however, has stifled innovation. The focus on industrialization has led to a lot of stagnation. A lot of CIOs are now discovering that polishing the ERP system is no longer enough.

Dave Aron, a vice president and fellow with Gartner, says

To address the innovation issue, leading-edge IT organizations are starting to bifurcate their operations, Aron says. Traditional IT executives are continuing to focus on making systems of record more efficient, but a new class of entrepreneurially minded executives is being put in charge of what is collectively being referred to as “systems of engagement.” “One symptom of that is the emergence of the title of chief digital officer within a lot of organizations,” says Aron. It’s often not clear whether the chief digital officer is an IT or marketing person, but what is clear is that they usually trying to drive some form of business innovation.

Digital Fear and Loathing in the CIO Ranks

Interactivity as it relates to digital media is changing

Tessa Wegert, ClickZ

Within the past twelve months we watched ESPN create a dynamic unit that ran on site visitor participation; users voted for their pick in a game between Alabama and Notre Dame, and as the votes came in, the ad changed color to reflect the team they put in the lead. Elsewhere on the Web, videos are being made shoppable to boost interest and capitalize on purchase intent. Even native ads are evolving, leaving static sponsorships behind in lieu of interactive features customized for each consumer’s needs.

An Interactivity Call to Arms | ClickZ

Social media marketing: what’s most important for 2014
Twitter to become more important than Facebook. In the US, and among teens, FB has peaked. Teens and customer service departments alike have reasons to prefer Twitter.
Google+ to keep growing in popularity. Its social network is becoming an integral part of search engine optimization. 
Visual content will become integral to marketing. The success of mage-sharing networks such as Pinterest, Tumblr, Vine, Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube show the extent of consumer preference for visual content over text.
Micro videos will surpass conventional ones. Vine, with its 6-second marketing opportunites, is an example of  short videos impact. Instagram too is featuring 3-15 second videos. Short video will be viewed on smartphones and tablets.
User-generated content will keep growing. Urban Outfitters, for example, uses customer-created snapshots to create a gallery linked to pages for purchasing each customer-illustrated outfit. 

(via Top 5 Social Media Marketing Trends Of 2014 - Business 2 Community)

Social media marketing: what’s most important for 2014

Twitter to become more important than Facebook. In the US, and among teens, FB has peaked. Teens and customer service departments alike have reasons to prefer Twitter.

Google+ to keep growing in popularity. Its social network is becoming an integral part of search engine optimization. 

Visual content will become integral to marketing. The success of mage-sharing networks such as Pinterest, Tumblr, Vine, Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube show the extent of consumer preference for visual content over text.

Micro videos will surpass conventional ones. Vine, with its 6-second marketing opportunites, is an example of  short videos impact. Instagram too is featuring 3-15 second videos. Short video will be viewed on smartphones and tablets.

User-generated content will keep growing. Urban Outfitters, for example, uses customer-created snapshots to create a gallery linked to pages for purchasing each customer-illustrated outfit. 

(via Top 5 Social Media Marketing Trends Of 2014 - Business 2 Community)