When you think about cognitive learning, where computers can tweak a different response to make it more personalised, we might get to that point, like the movie Her, where you could get to a point where you have a cognitive system that could be the customer service person.

Top CIOs are thinking like CEOs about customer experience
CIOs in outperforming organizations are almost 90% more likely to have a cohesive digital-physical strategy than  underperformers, according to a study of 1,656 CIOs, part of the larger IBM C-Suite Study. 
via Moving from the back office to the front lines — CIO insights from the IBM Global C-suite Study

Top CIOs are thinking like CEOs about customer experience

CIOs in outperforming organizations are almost 90% more likely to have a cohesive digital-physical strategy than  underperformers, according to a study of 1,656 CIOs, part of the larger IBM C-Suite Study. 

via Moving from the back office to the front lines — CIO insights from the IBM Global C-suite Study

How an IBM experiment improved innovation and morale
The IBM initiative is one of the world’s first enterprise crowdfunding projects, started in the spring of 2012. The decision of how and where to allocate the company fund was left up to the employees.
500 employees in IBM’s Research division were each given $100 and the chance to propose a project — but they could only use the funds to support the projects of their co-workers, not their own, for needs shared by employees such as a 3D printer. The participation rate was a whopping 46 percent. A second trial in another Research division had even stronger participation.
The third trial of the concept was run by the CIO and IT divisions, offering $10,000 to $50,000 per project, and focused only on technologies. About 300 employees from 29 countries were involved and 10 projects were successfully funded. (Like Kickstarter, the model was an all-or-nothing funding.) Compared to the first trial, where only 42 percent of the funding came from people unknown to the project leader, in the second trial 80 percent came from anonymous donors within the organization.

via Enterprise crowdfunding: VentureBeat

How an IBM experiment improved innovation and morale

The IBM initiative is one of the world’s first enterprise crowdfunding projects, started in the spring of 2012. The decision of how and where to allocate the company fund was left up to the employees.

500 employees in IBM’s Research division were each given $100 and the chance to propose a project — but they could only use the funds to support the projects of their co-workers, not their own, for needs shared by employees such as a 3D printer. The participation rate was a whopping 46 percent. A second trial in another Research division had even stronger participation.

The third trial of the concept was run by the CIO and IT divisions, offering $10,000 to $50,000 per project, and focused only on technologies. About 300 employees from 29 countries were involved and 10 projects were successfully funded. (Like Kickstarter, the model was an all-or-nothing funding.) Compared to the first trial, where only 42 percent of the funding came from people unknown to the project leader, in the second trial 80 percent came from anonymous donors within the organization.

via Enterprise crowdfunding: VentureBeat

Getting your employees on board with social
Integrate social into business processes. Store information on internal social network to drive employees to social tools.
Get mobile. Social networks, email, blogs, IM, calendars should be available on all devices.
Drive culture with governance. Provide guidelines that encourage employees to be social. 
Reverse mentor leaders. Front-line workers can help business leaders answer such questions as, “Should I use a wiki, blog or community for this situation?”
Via Tech Republic. 10 tips for getting your employees on board with social 

Getting your employees on board with social

  • Integrate social into business processes. Store information on internal social network to drive employees to social tools.
  • Get mobile. Social networks, email, blogs, IM, calendars should be available on all devices.
  • Drive culture with governance. Provide guidelines that encourage employees to be social. 
  • Reverse mentor leaders. Front-line workers can help business leaders answer such questions as, “Should I use a wiki, blog or community for this situation?”

Via Tech Republic. 10 tips for getting your employees on board with social 

When Building a Social Employee culture, It’s All About the Why

One of the fundamental arguments of The Social Employee is that a brand cannot communicate externally unless it first learns to communicate internally. How executives reach out, communicate, and make themselves available to their own employees sets a cultural tone. By showing employees that they are ready to walk the talk through daily video blogs or engaging on internal social networks, that executive is leaving no ambiguity as to what the company expects from its employees, or why they think these behaviors are valuable.

(via Cheryl Burgess, A Smarter Planet Blog)

When Building a Social Employee culture, It’s All About the Why

One of the fundamental arguments of The Social Employee is that a brand cannot communicate externally unless it first learns to communicate internally. How executives reach out, communicate, and make themselves available to their own employees sets a cultural tone. By showing employees that they are ready to walk the talk through daily video blogs or engaging on internal social networks, that executive is leaving no ambiguity as to what the company expects from its employees, or why they think these behaviors are valuable.

(via Cheryl Burgess, A Smarter Planet Blog)