Are entrepreneurs really more comfortable with risk?

Answer — entrepreneurs define risk differently than big companies do:

For them, risk isn’t as defined by losing tangibles (e.g., income, benefits, “stuff”) as it is by losing intangibles: fulfilling a passion that won’t let go, defining their own sense of purpose, sating their own curiosity, looking themselves in the mirror.

So, entrepreneurs would rather risk outputs (products, profits, etc) than outcomes (results that make a difference to what they believe in)

Via Harvard Business Review


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It’s easy to think of gaming as kids stuff, and the behavior-driving techniques honed by the gaming industry limited to getting the unwashed Internet masses to play Farmville or boost engagement in marketing campaigns. But it turns out that the same motivators that get the adrenaline pumping in a 15-year-old gamer also drive executives. So those gamification techiques are also being used to nudge corporate executives into performing desired functions - including completing online training programs in large multinational corporations.
 - Image source 

Gamifying the Executive Suite | ReadWriteWeb

It’s easy to think of gaming as kids stuff, and the behavior-driving techniques honed by the gaming industry limited to getting the unwashed Internet masses to play Farmville or boost engagement in marketing campaigns. But it turns out that the same motivators that get the adrenaline pumping in a 15-year-old gamer also drive executives. So those gamification techiques are also being used to nudge corporate executives into performing desired functions - including completing online training programs in large multinational corporations.

 - Image source 

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