Investment in headcount and infrastructure have steadily grown, as companies reach “intermediate” stages of social business. Several are turning their sights from “social media” as an extension of marketing and communications, and seek to push a “social business” agenda throughout the organization. Top findings include:
Most organizations are “intermediate,” with only 17% self-described as “strategic” in the execution of their social strategies.
78% of companies have a dedicated social media team, at the division, corporate or both levels 
Companies are committing more headcount to social media across all sizes of organizations. The biggest jump is for companies with more than 100,000 employees, which now report an average of 49 full-time employees supporting social media, compared to 20 in 2010.
85% of companies have an organizational social media policy, yet only 18% of companies report that their employees’ knowledge of social media usage and the organizational policy is either good or very good.
(via Charlene Li, The State of Social Business in 2013 | LinkedIn)

Investment in headcount and infrastructure have steadily grown, as companies reach “intermediate” stages of social business. Several are turning their sights from “social media” as an extension of marketing and communications, and seek to push a “social business” agenda throughout the organization. Top findings include:

  • Most organizations are “intermediate,” with only 17% self-described as “strategic” in the execution of their social strategies.
  • 78% of companies have a dedicated social media team, at the division, corporate or both levels 
  • Companies are committing more headcount to social media across all sizes of organizations. The biggest jump is for companies with more than 100,000 employees, which now report an average of 49 full-time employees supporting social media, compared to 20 in 2010.
  • 85% of companies have an organizational social media policy, yet only 18% of companies report that their employees’ knowledge of social media usage and the organizational policy is either good or very good.

(via Charlene Li, The State of Social Business in 2013 | LinkedIn)

Privacy as we knew it is dead.

Generation X and to some extent the older side of Generation Y, are the last to know privacy as it was. Privacy for the most part is something that older generations guarded. For most, privacy was and is sacred, worthy of protecting. Publicity on the other hand was almost a luxury. To earn the attention of the masses required investment and strategy. It’s almost the opposite is true among digital natives. Privacy now is something that you have to teach or learn the hard way.

(via Broadcast Yourselfie: How teens use social media and why it matters to you - Brian Solis)

Privacy as we knew it is dead.

Generation X and to some extent the older side of Generation Y, are the last to know privacy as it was. Privacy for the most part is something that older generations guarded. For most, privacy was and is sacred, worthy of protecting. Publicity on the other hand was almost a luxury. To earn the attention of the masses required investment and strategy. It’s almost the opposite is true among digital natives. Privacy now is something that you have to teach or learn the hard way.

(via Broadcast Yourselfie: How teens use social media and why it matters to you - Brian Solis)

What’s the Future of Business? A new book by Brian Solis, who calls it an analog app: “I believe so much in the future of shared experiences that I used the print version of this book to make that very point.”
(via My interview with Brian Solis on the future of business | Conversation Management)

What’s the Future of Business? A new book by Brian Solis, who calls it an analog app: “I believe so much in the future of shared experiences that I used the print version of this book to make that very point.”

(via My interview with Brian Solis on the future of business | Conversation Management)

Going from social to digital engagement. This customer journey map outlines the steps digitally connected customers take during and following decision-making. Various channels (mobile, social, web, “real-life”) all contribute to experiences that influence customers’ level of engagement, purchase and loyalty. Business leaders are currently defining new roles and responsibilities to unify and optimize the customer journey.
        (via The Imminent Evolution from Social to Digital Engagement | AT&T Networking Exchange Blog - Image source)
Going from social to digital engagement. This customer journey map outlines the steps digitally connected customers take during and following decision-making. Various channels (mobile, social, web, “real-life”) all contribute to experiences that influence customers’ level of engagement, purchase and loyalty. Business leaders are currently defining new roles and responsibilities to unify and optimize the customer journey.

(via The Imminent Evolution from Social to Digital Engagement | AT&T Networking Exchange Blog - Image source)

A new genre of social producers are taking aim at developing content strategies that are not only consumable, they’re shareable, actionable and act as catalysts or sparks for relevant conversations…. [Unlike] traditional content creators … they begin with the social outcomes they wish to see and reverse engineer content strategies to enliven them. They understand the relationship between cause and effect and they bake-in conversation starters related to an integrated and business-focused strategy … And the desired outcomes combined with the social effect they aim to trigger is then evaluated network by network.