I’d say the idea of controlling information flows is becoming an obsolete notion. To me, the basic point of the 2.0 era is that we can get out of the business of predefining and controlling those information flows. We get out of the business of defining who is entitled to generate information, who’s entitled to share it with whom, who is entitled to talk on different subjects.

The Social Business Value Creation Model | Social Media Blog for Business | Michael Brito
Social Business isn’t a theory, buzz word or the “Next Big Thing”. It’s simply a natural business evolution. It’s why companies like  Accenture, Deloitte, KPMG and others have been in business and  profitable for several decades, and in some cases, over 100 years.  They  help companies change behavior, improve processes and expand into new  markets because the dynamic nature of business is consistently changing.  And, many of the traditional management consulting firms are now  expanding their service offerings to include “social” (fill in the  blank) because organizations are now faced with new & improved  challenges.
The sole focus of social business,  social enterprise, enterprise 2.0 or whatever it’s going to be called  tomorrow isn’t just about making  business more social because it’s the  “thing to do” or to collaborate for the sake of collaboration. Sameer  Patel’s latest post sums it up quite well (referencing Professor McAfee) … “organizations  are looking to optimize their 9-5 in the face of market chaos,  globalization, and seriously inefficient demand and supply chains, and  yes, the changing dynamic of the prospect and customer, thanks to the  social web.” I would also add that many organizations are looking  to bring order to the internal chaos (and in some cases complete  anarchy) that social media has inflicted on business as well.

The Social Business Value Creation Model | Social Media Blog for Business | Michael Brito

Social Business isn’t a theory, buzz word or the “Next Big Thing”. It’s simply a natural business evolution. It’s why companies like Accenture, Deloitte, KPMG and others have been in business and profitable for several decades, and in some cases, over 100 years.  They help companies change behavior, improve processes and expand into new markets because the dynamic nature of business is consistently changing. And, many of the traditional management consulting firms are now expanding their service offerings to include “social” (fill in the blank) because organizations are now faced with new & improved challenges.

The sole focus of social business, social enterprise, enterprise 2.0 or whatever it’s going to be called tomorrow isn’t just about making  business more social because it’s the “thing to do” or to collaborate for the sake of collaboration. Sameer Patel’s latest post sums it up quite well (referencing Professor McAfee) … “organizations are looking to optimize their 9-5 in the face of market chaos, globalization, and seriously inefficient demand and supply chains, and yes, the changing dynamic of the prospect and customer, thanks to the social web.” I would also add that many organizations are looking to bring order to the internal chaos (and in some cases complete anarchy) that social media has inflicted on business as well.

If you’re saying that people are important, that businesses are inherently social systems and that social dynamics matter for performance, your insight is about 80 years old. If you’re saying that businesses would be better served by becoming more social, you’re once again decades behind the frontier. Same thing if you’re advocating that leaders be more open and attuned to the cultures and conversations of their organizations and customers. Ditto with emphasizing people, process, and technology. Maybe it’s important to say these things once again and maybe it’s not, but no one should pretend that it’s novel.

smarterplanet:

Do’s and Don’ts for Your Work’s Social Platforms - Andrew McAfee - Harvard Business Review
Enterprise 2.0 is not Web 2.0; corporate technologies are different than personal ones, even if they look and feel the same. They’re there to support the work of the organization, not to let individuals do and say whatever they want. As I’ve argued for some time, though, there’s no deep incompatibility between these two use cases. The autonomous and personalized actions and interactions of people, facilitated by technology, can be a great benefit to the enterprise, because this work creates new knowledge and fosters novel connections. 

smarterplanet:

Do’s and Don’ts for Your Work’s Social Platforms - Andrew McAfee - Harvard Business Review

Enterprise 2.0 is not Web 2.0; corporate technologies are different than personal ones, even if they look and feel the same. They’re there to support the work of the organization, not to let individuals do and say whatever they want. As I’ve argued for some time, though, there’s no deep incompatibility between these two use cases. The autonomous and personalized actions and interactions of people, facilitated by technology, can be a great benefit to the enterprise, because this work creates new knowledge and fosters novel connections.