Cloud computing may be a disruptive force, but two of the leading establishment vendors appear to be surging ahead in the market for online infrastructure services. Its also become a highly lucrative space, now worth more than $13 billion a year. Data just released by Synergy Research Group shows that Microsoft and IBM are leading the growth in cloud infrastructure services as of the second quarter this year.

Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code
Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.
The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.
In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.
“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”
Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

Apple and IBM Team Up to Push iOS in the Enterprise | Re/code

Apple and IBM today announced a broad partnership to help companies deploy wireless devices and business-specific applications to run on them.

The combination brings together two historical competitors — who decades ago struggled to dominate the nascent market for personal computers — on the next wave of computing in business: Mobile devices with access to complex data running in the cloud.

In an interview with Re/code at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple CEO Tim Cook and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty described the tie-up as one that only the two companies could deliver.

“If you were building a puzzle they would fit nicely together with no overlap,” Cook said of the relationship. “We do not compete on anything. And when you do that you end up with something better than either of you could produce yourself.”

Calling Apple the “gold standard for consumers,” Rometty said the team-up will allow the two giants to address significant opportunities facing large businesses. “We will get to remake professions and unlock value that companies don’t yet have,” she said. “We’re addressing serious issues that before this had been inhibiting deployment of wireless in the enterprise.”

(via smarterplanet)

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

Combining technology with human expertise
"Create websites and content for humans. Don’t do it for Google. Google is the machine part, and wants to find the right answer for people. If we create good content for humans, we trust that Google will be good at matching that up. [Marketers] get lost in the shortcuts while looking for a silver bullet. In 2014, a silver bullet doesn’t exist. You just have to use your brain and intuition to build unique, relevant content that people want to share."  —Mike Mothner, Wpromote
(via Beyond Big Data: Why Human Interpretation Still Counts | Fox Small Business Center)

Combining technology with human expertise

"Create websites and content for humans. Don’t do it for Google. Google is the machine part, and wants to find the right answer for people. If we create good content for humans, we trust that Google will be good at matching that up. [Marketers] get lost in the shortcuts while looking for a silver bullet. In 2014, a silver bullet doesn’t exist. You just have to use your brain and intuition to build unique, relevant content that people want to share."
—Mike Mothner, Wpromote

(via Beyond Big Data: Why Human Interpretation Still Counts | Fox Small Business Center)

Social media presents a great opportunity for retailers to understand customers better. Stores can analyze postings by individuals that indicate they’re shopping in their stores. By finding patterns matching the time of day with the demographic group that the consumers belong to, retailers can quickly shift their merchandising strategies — perhaps by using large digital screens to display items and prices tailored for a particular type of customer.

Michael Haydock, IBM, discussing retail, showrooming and analytics

Big Data Can Help Prevent “Showrooming” at Retail Stores

… high-end shopping mall DLF Promenade in the City [New Delhi] performs real-time analytics to convert data gathered from shopper’s movements in the mall to provide meaningful interactions for smartphone users…

once a user opts-in for the service, the solution performs analytics to understand consumer preferences based on location and interests in order to provide customised services via a mobile app.

DLF will also use the solution to allow retailers in the mall to extend sales deals to shoppers via the app, based on footfall heat maps.

Via Economic Times, India


Trying to address a smaller segment – an audience of one rather than many – actually increases data requirements. We have combined large sets of data to get to the origin of action, belief and motivation. If you’re really going to crack the code of individual marketing and engagement, you have to crack the social genome.

Bridget van Kralingen, IBM Global Business Services


IBM launches digital customer experience consultancy | IT PRO

Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank
Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.
(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

Social-mobile-analytics focus at a premier Asian bank

Singapore’s DBS Bank is the largest bank in Southeast Asia, with $401 billion (Singapore) in assets. It is the dominant retail bank in Singapore, and also has a growing presence in China and South Asia. The bank is using technologies like mobile, social media and analytics to remake its relationship with customers and its operations.

(via DBS Bank Pumps Up the Volume on its Technology | MIT Sloan Management Review)

Just announced — IBM Watson Group
The new division, based in New York City’s Silicon Alley, will have about 2,000 employees focused on software, services, research, experts and sales people.
IBM Watson Discovery Advisor is aimed at pharmaceutical, publishing and education research. The promise here is that Watson will wade through search results to deliver data and context faster for researchers.
IBM Watson Analytics Advisor is designed to be used by enterprises to send questions and raw data sets to Watson and allow the system to deliver insight.
(via IBM forms Watson Business Group: Will commercialization follow? | ZDNet)

Just announced — IBM Watson Group

The new division, based in New York City’s Silicon Alley, will have about 2,000 employees focused on software, services, research, experts and sales people.

  • IBM Watson Discovery Advisor is aimed at pharmaceutical, publishing and education research. The promise here is that Watson will wade through search results to deliver data and context faster for researchers.
  • IBM Watson Analytics Advisor is designed to be used by enterprises to send questions and raw data sets to Watson and allow the system to deliver insight.

(via IBM forms Watson Business Group: Will commercialization follow? | ZDNet)