APIs are about to scale in physical environments.
The ecosystem has been integral to wearables from day one. It is finding its way into finance – beyond payments where PayPal has been working with its ecosystem for three years – into innovation practices and the Internet of Things. That means it is primed for the broader manufacturing sector.
(via How The Smartphone Ecosystem Model Will Disrupt Business Everywhere)

APIs are about to scale in physical environments.

The ecosystem has been integral to wearables from day one. It is finding its way into finance – beyond payments where PayPal has been working with its ecosystem for three years – into innovation practices and the Internet of Things. That means it is primed for the broader manufacturing sector.

(via How The Smartphone Ecosystem Model Will Disrupt Business Everywhere)

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

Study shows long-term growth of communities comes from non-power contributors

We classified members of each WikiProject as either a power-user or non-power-user and compared the number of contributions made by power-users in the first year to those made by non-power-users. We found that: More contribution from non-power-users early in a project’s life leads to better long-term growth More contribution from power-users leads to slower long-term growth When power-users do too much early on, they may crowd out potential contributors and community members. Getting more people “in the door” in a community, even if they only make minimal contributions, makes the community more valuable and more productive in the long term. Online communities that seek growth should design their sites, policies, and incentives to encourage as many individuals as possible to join and make even minimal contributions.

(via Critical Mass of What? | Follow the Crowd)

Study shows long-term growth of communities comes from non-power contributors

We classified members of each WikiProject as either a power-user or non-power-user and compared the number of contributions made by power-users in the first year to those made by non-power-users. We found that: More contribution from non-power-users early in a project’s life leads to better long-term growth More contribution from power-users leads to slower long-term growth When power-users do too much early on, they may crowd out potential contributors and community members. Getting more people “in the door” in a community, even if they only make minimal contributions, makes the community more valuable and more productive in the long term. Online communities that seek growth should design their sites, policies, and incentives to encourage as many individuals as possible to join and make even minimal contributions.

(via Critical Mass of What? | Follow the Crowd)