APIs are about to scale in physical environments.
The ecosystem has been integral to wearables from day one. It is finding its way into finance – beyond payments where PayPal has been working with its ecosystem for three years – into innovation practices and the Internet of Things. That means it is primed for the broader manufacturing sector.
(via How The Smartphone Ecosystem Model Will Disrupt Business Everywhere)

APIs are about to scale in physical environments.

The ecosystem has been integral to wearables from day one. It is finding its way into finance – beyond payments where PayPal has been working with its ecosystem for three years – into innovation practices and the Internet of Things. That means it is primed for the broader manufacturing sector.

(via How The Smartphone Ecosystem Model Will Disrupt Business Everywhere)

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

Tomorrow’s forecast calls for personalized clouds | VentureBeat | Cloud | by Kelly Chambliss, IBM

It’s the age of personalization.

Our laptops, phones, and tablets suggest books we should read and movies we should watch. Grocery stores give out coupons based on our buying habits. But up until now, cloud computing has been ready-made, rather than custom-made. That’s about to change.

Study shows long-term growth of communities comes from non-power contributors

We classified members of each WikiProject as either a power-user or non-power-user and compared the number of contributions made by power-users in the first year to those made by non-power-users. We found that: More contribution from non-power-users early in a project’s life leads to better long-term growth More contribution from power-users leads to slower long-term growth When power-users do too much early on, they may crowd out potential contributors and community members. Getting more people “in the door” in a community, even if they only make minimal contributions, makes the community more valuable and more productive in the long term. Online communities that seek growth should design their sites, policies, and incentives to encourage as many individuals as possible to join and make even minimal contributions.

(via Critical Mass of What? | Follow the Crowd)

Study shows long-term growth of communities comes from non-power contributors

We classified members of each WikiProject as either a power-user or non-power-user and compared the number of contributions made by power-users in the first year to those made by non-power-users. We found that: More contribution from non-power-users early in a project’s life leads to better long-term growth More contribution from power-users leads to slower long-term growth When power-users do too much early on, they may crowd out potential contributors and community members. Getting more people “in the door” in a community, even if they only make minimal contributions, makes the community more valuable and more productive in the long term. Online communities that seek growth should design their sites, policies, and incentives to encourage as many individuals as possible to join and make even minimal contributions.

(via Critical Mass of What? | Follow the Crowd)

You Are How You Surf
Just as some experts can spot a physical imposter by noticing a difference in gait, the IBM invention tracks minute details about the way users interact with the browser and website. Using some areas of the site more than others, navigating with the keyboard, sticking strictly with the mouse, swiping a tablet in a particular way…all of these small characteristics build up an overall profile that identifies you, the legitimate user. A hacker who logs into your account will “look” completely different, so the detection system will send a warning. The secure site can respond by requiring additional authentication. Of course, false detections are possible. Keith Walker, IBM Master Inventor and co-inventor on the patent, noted that a change in interaction could be “due to a broken hand or using a tablet instead of a desktop computer,” but pointed out that “such a change would more likely be due to fraud.” In any case, a legitimate user will have no trouble providing additional authentication.
(via IBM Identifies You By Your Web Surfing Style)

You Are How You Surf

Just as some experts can spot a physical imposter by noticing a difference in gait, the IBM invention tracks minute details about the way users interact with the browser and website. Using some areas of the site more than others, navigating with the keyboard, sticking strictly with the mouse, swiping a tablet in a particular way…all of these small characteristics build up an overall profile that identifies you, the legitimate user. A hacker who logs into your account will “look” completely different, so the detection system will send a warning. The secure site can respond by requiring additional authentication. Of course, false detections are possible. Keith Walker, IBM Master Inventor and co-inventor on the patent, noted that a change in interaction could be “due to a broken hand or using a tablet instead of a desktop computer,” but pointed out that “such a change would more likely be due to fraud.” In any case, a legitimate user will have no trouble providing additional authentication.

(via IBM Identifies You By Your Web Surfing Style)

Why top-down transformation works

Many social enterprise advocates reverse this order of priority, emphasizing the importance of things like empowerment, egalitarianism and engagement in creating the kind of cultural environment that enables employees to leverage social tools most effectively. As an extension of that argument, they’ll emphasize that more hierarchical and command-and-control environments are not only not conducive to social technologies, but that they’re antithetical to them. As well intentioned as these ideas may be, they’re a little bit misguided and maybe even counterproductive. The truth of the matter is that social technologies can work perfectly well in more traditional cultures because of the ways in which they can enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Especially in the short term, performance values may be the biggest drivers of adoption, so their importance should be emphasized rather than minimized.
(via The Bricks and Mortar of Digital Transformation)

Why top-down transformation works

Many social enterprise advocates reverse this order of priority, emphasizing the importance of things like empowerment, egalitarianism and engagement in creating the kind of cultural environment that enables employees to leverage social tools most effectively. As an extension of that argument, they’ll emphasize that more hierarchical and command-and-control environments are not only not conducive to social technologies, but that they’re antithetical to them. As well intentioned as these ideas may be, they’re a little bit misguided and maybe even counterproductive. The truth of the matter is that social technologies can work perfectly well in more traditional cultures because of the ways in which they can enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Especially in the short term, performance values may be the biggest drivers of adoption, so their importance should be emphasized rather than minimized.

(via The Bricks and Mortar of Digital Transformation)