parislemon:

Insert the joke here: Times change — The times they are a-changin’ — Think different.
But really, this IBM deal seems like a smart partnership for Apple. They could either double their workforce to fully go after enterprise, or they can partner with a massive company already doing that. 
Yes, Apple likes to control every aspect of what they do. But enterprise is not a core competency and won’t be any time soon. Yet customers are demanding it. Hence, this deal.
And yes, this is potentially very bad news for Microsoft — which, oddly, is now the one trying to do everything itself. 

parislemon:

Insert the joke hereTimes changeThe times they are a-changin’Think different.

But really, this IBM deal seems like a smart partnership for Apple. They could either double their workforce to fully go after enterprise, or they can partner with a massive company already doing that. 

Yes, Apple likes to control every aspect of what they do. But enterprise is not a core competency and won’t be any time soon. Yet customers are demanding it. Hence, this deal.

And yes, this is potentially very bad news for Microsoft — which, oddly, is now the one trying to do everything itself

ibmblr:

Watson, the decision whisperer
At the rate you hear the words ‘big data’ and ‘analytics’ thrown around these days, you might think everyone was using them. And sadly you’d be wrong. In reality, most business folks leave insights out of their decisions because the tools to extract them are too complicated. Here’s a new name to drop. IBM Watson Analytics. Using natural language and a keyboard, anyone can go mining data for instant insights. Just ask your question and Watson can help guide you through answers. No fancy statistics degree required. Get the scoop →

ibmblr:

Watson, the decision whisperer

At the rate you hear the words ‘big data’ and ‘analytics’ thrown around these days, you might think everyone was using them. And sadly you’d be wrong. In reality, most business folks leave insights out of their decisions because the tools to extract them are too complicated. Here’s a new name to drop. IBM Watson Analytics. Using natural language and a keyboard, anyone can go mining data for instant insights. Just ask your question and Watson can help guide you through answers. No fancy statistics degree required. Get the scoop 

Can a Robot Be Your Boss? — Knowledge@Wharton

Meet the new boss. She never plays favorites and doesn’t partake in office gossip. She gives clear directions. At performance review time she offers valuable observations and backs them up with examples. She is perfect. Well, almost. If she does tend to repeat herself and wouldn’t give you time off to attend your son’s violin recital, you’ll have to forgive her: She’s a robot.

Totally automated management may seem far-fetched, and, indeed, few see the day when the authority figure in the corner office is an automaton. But in recent years, a surprising array of managerial functions has been turned over to artificial intelligence. Computers are sorting resumes of job seekers for relevant experience and to estimate how long a potential employee is likely to stay. They are mapping email exchanges, phone calls and even impromptu hallway interactions to track workflow and recommend changes. Widely used software is analyzing customer data for algorithms, which in turn is changing when and where workers are deployed.

Can a Robot Be Your Boss? — Knowledge@Wharton

Meet the new boss. She never plays favorites and doesn’t partake in office gossip. She gives clear directions. At performance review time she offers valuable observations and backs them up with examples. She is perfect. Well, almost. If she does tend to repeat herself and wouldn’t give you time off to attend your son’s violin recital, you’ll have to forgive her: She’s a robot.

Totally automated management may seem far-fetched, and, indeed, few see the day when the authority figure in the corner office is an automaton. But in recent years, a surprising array of managerial functions has been turned over to artificial intelligence. Computers are sorting resumes of job seekers for relevant experience and to estimate how long a potential employee is likely to stay. They are mapping email exchanges, phone calls and even impromptu hallway interactions to track workflow and recommend changes. Widely used software is analyzing customer data for algorithms, which in turn is changing when and where workers are deployed.